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New York Central

Grand Hyatt
109 E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10017 40.751737 -73.976706
nr. Park Ave.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
646-213-6865 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: American Nouveau, Eclectic/Global
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Courtesy of New York Central

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Official Website

nycentralrestaurant.com

Hours

Daily, 6:30am-2pm and 5pm-10:30pm

Nearby Subway Stops

4, 5, 6, 7, S at Grand Central-42nd St.; B, D, F, M at 42nd St.-Bryant Park

Prices

$20-$50

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Breakfast
  • Business Lunch
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Lunch
  • Open Kitchens / Watch the Chef
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Accepted/Not Necessary

Profile

If you miss your train home to Westport, New York Central stands ready to rescue your dinnertime from the fast-food goblins in the basement of Grand Central. Nothing on the seasonally changing menu will blow your train whistle, but there are some solid takes on basics, and several have genuinely interesting details. The skyscraping burger, for example, comes on a sourdough bun with enough toppings to decorate three sandwiches: in the summer it's cheddar, cucumber, and eggplant jam, plus the standards. There is always a risotto—pea and mint in the early summer, sweet corn later on. Chef Kenneth Osder makes his pastas and charcuteries in-house and, of course, sources ingredients locally when possible. Walking up into the restaurant's loft off the Hyatt hotel lobby, the influences are less Gilded Age transport hub and more space-age launch pad. The white bar, lit up from within, looks ready for take off. In one hat-tip to the rails running under the building, the logo recalls a subway token. But an array of flat-screens lined up behind the bar speaks to a transient crowd from farther afield.

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