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Home > Restaurants > Salinas

Salinas

136 Ninth Ave., New York, NY 10011 40.743639 -74.002992
nr. 19th St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-776-1990 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Spanish/Tapas
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

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  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Patrick Siggins

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Official Website

salinasnyc.com

Hours

Mon-Sat, 6pm-11pm; Sun, noon-4pm and 6pm-8pm

Nearby Subway Stops

A, C, E at 14th St.; L at Eighth Ave.

Prices

Appetizers, $7 to $18; entrées, $21 to $38.

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Brunch - Weekend
  • Fireplace
  • Private Dining/Party Space

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

The great Spanish culinary revolution may have forever changed the way we look at food, but Spanish restaurants have always been a tough sell in this fickle town. Just ask the talented chef Luis Bollo, whose great Soho restaurant, Meigas, closed several years back despite generally rave reviews by critics (including me). Bollo plied his trade out in the provinces for a while (the Meigas in Norwalk, Connecticut, was a hit), but now he’s back to try his luck with a more conventional Spanish venture in Chelsea called Salinas. His menu this time around is devoid of tricky, El Bulli–style emulsions and foams. You can get a nice glass of sangria at the curiously pokey little bar, and a roster of familiar “regional” specialties (Ibérico ham, gazpacho made with heirloom tomatoes, a dank version of squid-ink-rich paella negra for two) in the restaurant’s garden room, out back.

Bollo’s time in the suburbs has taken some of the edge off his old style, but several of these classic dishes are worth the price of admission. I’m thinking of the crunchy, puffy crujiente mahonés (a kind of fresh-baked flatbread sprinkled with honey, thyme, and shavings of mahon cheese), the generously garlicky, head-on langostinos al ajillo, and the little segments of quail, which Bollo wraps in ribbons of apple-smoked bacon and drizzles with sherry. Best of all, though, is that ageless Iberian delicacy roast suckling pig, which the chef slow-cooks for half a day in a sherry reduction, then crisps to an almost candied sweetness.

Ideal Meal

Crujiente mahonés, head-on shrimp, roast suckling pig, torrija caramelizada.

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