Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Home > Restaurants > Szechuan Chalet

Szechuan Chalet

1395 Second Ave., New York, NY 10021 40.769381 -73.958188
nr. 72nd St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-737-1838 Send to Phone

    Order Online

  • Cuisine: Chinese
  • Price Range: $$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: ***

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Patrick Siggins

Share this listing

Official Website

szechuanchaletnyc.com

Nearby Subway Stops

6 at 68th St.-Hunter College; 6 at 77th St.

Special Features

  • Delivery
  • Family Style
  • Delivery after 10pm

Alcohol

  • Beer and Wine Only

Reservations

Accepted/Not Necessary

Delivery

Profile

This venue is closed.

Since migrating from Fort Lee in the fall of 2009, chef Wei Lu’s menu has given Upper East Siders their fix of competent Szechuan standards like chunky orange beef and moo shu expertly swaddled tableside. There are also a number of concoctions utilizing quirky, unexpected ingredients: bacon, pine nuts, pesto, apples, and asparagus bisque make appearances in stir-frys and soups or lavished on seafood. A portion of noodles is dressed in pesto and, with razor clams for a tail, is fashioned in the likeness of a showy peacock. Not as much to look at is a plate of camphor and tea smoked duck, but the tender, fatty, skin-on segments have a distinct smoldering flavor. When stuck into an accompanying wrinkly steamed bun, you have a delicious if oddly shaped sandwich. The double-cooked fresh bacon arrives in a coronary-inducing heap, seasoned with scallion and capsicum peppers. It’s not possible to eat more than a few tasty strips, but this Asian treatment of breakfast meat might just be crazy enough to work.

Advertising
Advertising