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Home > Restaurants > The Beatrice Inn

The Beatrice Inn

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

285 W. 12th St., New York, NY 10014 40.737492 -74.004069
nr. 4th St.   See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-675-2808 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: American Traditional, Eclectic/Global, Steakhouse
  • Price Range: $$$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: **

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    7 out of 10

      |  

    2 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Liz Clayman

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Official Website

thebeatriceinn.com

Hours

Tue-Sat, 5:30pm-midnight; Sun, noon-midnight; Mon, closed

Nearby Subway Stops

A, C, E at 14th St.; L at Eighth Ave.

Prices

$19-$67

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Bar Scene
  • Celeb-Spotting
  • Hot Spot

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

Over its decades-long run, the Beatrice Inn has served as a Prohibition-era speakeasy, a family-owned 1950s Italian restaurant, a subterranean coke den for early-aughts A-listers, and a “classic chophouse” for media elite, but the actual food has never held any real allure. In recent years, it’s actually become a notoriously terrible place to cook: Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter reopened the restaurant in 2012 and went through three high-profile chefs in the span of a single year. When Angie Mar — then a sous-chef at the Spotted Pig — heard about the job opening in 2013, she didn’t want the gig, either. When she eventually caved and checked it out, she saw that the dining room was stunning. She also realized that if she stayed at the Spotted Pig, she would continue to cook Bloomfield’s food. After cooking her predecessor’s food for one week, Mar transformed the entire menu, adding dishes like a milk-braised pork shoulder that she’s been making with her Chinese-American family since she was 15. Like her 45-day-dry-aged burger, it’s elevated comfort food. But Mar not only runs the kitchen; she’s since become the owner of the storied restaurant. There’s no bad blood here: Mar says Carter and his partners, Emil Varda and Brett Rasinski, gave her the autonomy she needed to execute her vision. It came as quite a surprise, then, when the three men approached Mar to buy them out. She’s still unsure why, exactly, but she didn’t hesitate to say yes.

Note

The wine selection is impressive for a speakeasy, but it isn’t cheap. Twenty-nine of the 40 reds on the list cost $100 or more. 

Recommended Dishes

Dry-aged burger, $38; milk-braised pork shoulder, $28; lamb tartare, $19

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