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Wild Salmon

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

622 Third Ave., New York, NY 10017 40.749589 -73.975342
at 40th St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-404-1700 Send to Phone

  • Cuisine: Seafood
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    10 out of 10

      |  

    3 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Jeremy Liebman for New York Magazine

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Official Website

chinagrillmgt.com

Hours

Mon-Wed, 11:30am-2pm and 5:30pm-10pm; Thu-Sat, 11:30am-2pm and 5pm-11pm; Sun, 11:30am-9pm

Nearby Subway Stops

4, 5, 6, 7, S at Grand Central-42nd St.

Prices

$24-$38

Payment Methods

American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Brunch - Weekend
  • Business Lunch
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

This venue is closed.

Salmon is useless to restaurant critics. It’s a stolid, predictable fish that chefs tend to prepare in stolid, predictable ways. So leave it to Jeffrey Chodorow, the tireless impresario of Chinese food (China Grill), Cuban food (Asia de Cuba), Brazilian food (the defunct Caviar and Banana), and, most recently, Kobe beef (Kobe Club), to imbue this tired, overstretched fish with a dose of big-city glamour. The name of his newest restaurant is Wild Salmon, and the venue is Chodorow’s grandest stage of all, a majestic glass-and-metal structure which once housed an insurance company. Wild Salmon is not a franchise, however, and to implement his particular vision, Chodorow has brought in Charles Ramseyer, a noted seafood chef from that great salmon mecca, Seattle, Washington. Ramseyer makes a point of flying in different varieties of fresh wild salmon, daily, from the Pacific Northwest. The tall, glass-and-metal room appears much as it did during the previous Chodorow productions, only the overweening smell of truffle oil has disappeared, and the ceiling has been hung with glowing, lattice-covered lanterns, and hundreds of curious, sperm-shaped sculptures, which appear to bound along under the roof of the restaurant, like so many salmon on a great spawn. Such theatrics are tame by Chodorow’s standards, and the restaurant’s menu, which covers a single large page, is relatively tame too. There are only eight kinds of sauce offered with your salmon, and if you avoid most of them, along with many of the superfluous non-seafood items, it’s possible to enjoy that rare thing in the hectic Chodorow universe: a fairly good, fairly relaxed meal.

Note

The brunch specialty: eggs Benedict with house-smoked sockeye, king, and coho, over latkes.

Ideal Meal

Mt. St. Helens Seafood Platter, house-smoked salmon platter, sand dab or sablefish, apple upside-down cake.

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