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1968
The era of the really, really mini.

Photo: Vernon Merritt III/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Late Sixties
Three variations on what the young art crowd wore.

Photo: Bernard Gotfryd

1968
The Afro, celebrated.

1970
The midriff, a focal point of the seventies. (right)

Photos: Yale Joel/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images; Neal Preston/Corbis

1971
Once the province of go-go dancers, white boots indicated modness.

The Love Story effect. (right)

Photos: Paul McDonough; Ernst Haas/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

1974
A widely imitated Jackie O. look: giant glasses, scarf-wrapped head.

Photo: Joel Meyerowitz

1975
A military-hippy mashup.

1974
Before it was a PETA target, fur was a status symbol. (right)

Photos: Tim Boxer/Getty Images; Paul McDonough

1977
Good-bye, business suit; hello, leisure suit.

1978
Everyone did the Annie Hall look, including Brooke Shields. (right)

Photo: JP Laffont/Sygma/Corbis; Lynn Goldsmith/Corbis

Late Seventies
In discoland, glam and girlish elements blended.

Photos: Ebet Roberts; Cosmos Sarchiapone

Late Seventies
Club kids and punks. One wore Lycra, the other, leather.

Photos: Arlene Gottfried; Ebet Roberts

1980s
The hourglass—puffy shoulders and a hip ruffle.

Early Eighties
Post–Official Preppy Handbook, David Letterman’s rumpled chinos and rep ties were boyishly sexy, not dorky.

Photos: Back In The Days, by Jamel Shabazz/Powerhouse Books; Everett Collection

1981
Bare skin, bleached hair; nighttime’s hard edges became round-the-clock wear.

1981
Big shoulders! (center)

1983
And then there was that infatuation with the Southwest. (right)

Photos: Patrick D. Pagnano (bleached hair, southwest); Jean Louis Atlan/Sygma/Corbis(shoulders)

Mid-Eighties
Heavily accessorized and worn with jeans, the familiar tweed jacket became young again.

Photo: Amy Arbus

1984
Equally prevalent: uptight and tailored, or bulky Japanese-influenced layers.

Photos: Amy Arbus

1985
Adults wore cartoons, in all seriousness.

1988
Socialites were reliably glossy and exuberant in their silhouettes. (right)

Photos: Patrick D. Pagnano; Ron Galella/Wire Image

Late Eighties
The Dress for Success era; no-nonsense suit, matching bag and briefcase.

1989
Big hair! (right)

Photos: Ted Russell/Getty Images; George Rose/Getty Images

1990
Tight, short, red, and worn with heels; this was evening glam.

Early Nineties
And on the street, clothing barely touched the body. (right)

Photos: Ron Galella/Wire Image; David Corio

1992
Grunge.

Nineties
Men’s underwear becomes outerwear. (right)

Photos: Times Newspapers/Rex Features; Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times/Redux

1994
David Bowie and Iman in his-and-her power suits.

1997
Minimalism, embodied by Carolyn Bessette. (right)

Photos: Charles Sykes/Rex Features; Kevin Wisniewski/Rex/Everett Collection

1998
Diddy, the swelegant hip-hop dandy.

1999
Our favorite color. (right)

Photos: Dave Allocca/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images; Stephen Ferry/Getty Images

2001
Marc Jacobs’s finely tuned secondary line mainstreamed vintage-eclectic mixing.

2000s
Trend OD: Murakami Vuitton bag, trucker hat, way too much pink. (center)

2001
Real sex columnists don’t wear tutus. (right)

Photos: First View; Christina Paige; Evan Agostini/Getty Images

2006
Birkin and Chanel, just two of the status bag’s expanding universe.

Now
Skinny jeans, quirky hats, and … the era of the really, really mini again. (right)

Photos: Mark Peterson/Redux; AltamiraNYC

40th-Anniversary Features

boom-bust-boom townBoom-Bust-Boom Town
In 1968, many New Yorkers were panicked about the city’s future too. Needlessly, as it turned out.

 

woody allenChatting With Woody
New York’s hometown auteur on whether a lifetime of psychoanalysis has paid off, and why kids from Yale no longer like good movies.
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