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Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert’s psychedelic experiments at Harvard, which were begun in 1960, were steeped in forms, schedules, surveys, and other artifacts of the scientific method. Alpert even filled out the drug surveys himself. So we know he felt “great” about taking drugs on this particular July 16.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Leary and Alpert (with others, on a boat trip rather early in their association) were still headed for conventional academic lives—and dressed the part.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Alpert, later known as Ram Dass, was Leary’s brilliant professor-partner. Here, he uses the same kitchen where Ginsberg made his naked, tripped-out phone call to Kerouac.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photos of Leary with his family—many of them warm and joyous—seem especially poignant, given that Leary’s first wife and daughter Susan (pictured here with Leary) both committed suicide.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

After being kicked out of Harvard in 1963, Leary kept up his activies at an upstate New York estate until LSD became illegal nationwide in 1968. Leary was eventually imprisoned, then escaped. His time on the lam—in North Africa, with the Black Panthers, and then in Afghanistan, where he was captured by the Feds in 1973—is hazily documented, but there is a photo of him at a monument to Camus in Algeria, in 1971.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Sentenced to ten years in a California prison, Leary was released by Governor Jerry Brown in 1976. But he used his stint in California’s Folsom prison productively—by expanding on (and writing this monograph about) his psychedelic theories, positing that man was bound to seek intelligent life in outer space.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

A manuscript copy of the Starseed draft shows how carefully he edited his many writings, no matter how trippy the finished product might seem.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Leary’s photo scrapbooks, including not just intimate snapshots but collages and clever little cut-out slogans à la Barbara Kruger, testify to both his obsessions and his Dada sense of humor. Here he pokes fun at his role as a leader …

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

… And here he’s the shirtless American saint (though not even his estate knows for sure what he was thinking when he made these).

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

One of Leary’s correspondents was his goddaughter, Winona Ryder. Her father, Michael Horowitz, a writer and archivist, was one of Leary’s best friends. Here’s a drawing from Ryder, age 10, circa 1981.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Another drawing from Ryder.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Later in life, Lery took to the lecture circuit full time, hanging with some characters even stranger than him.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Leary spent his final years palling around with celebrities like Susan Sarandon and cyberevangelists like Douglas Rushkoff, who dug his writings on consciousness at the dawn of the Internet Age. Leary died in 1996; his death mask is now at the New York Public Library with the rest of his papers.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim

Artifacts from a long, strange life.

Photo: Danny Kim
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