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Elaine Kirschenblatt, 69

“Unless he moderates his positions, it’s going to be a difficult thing for me to vote for Obama in 2012. Ultimately, what do the Arabs really want? They want every Jew dead. And that’s unacceptable.”

Photographs by Michael Allin/New York Magazine

Jack Ecker, 66

“I think Obama is a schmuck. I think his foreign policy is inconsistent. We’re doing appeasement. We’re appeasing the radicals. The Islamic radicals. We’re forgetting it was the Arabs that have attacked Israel.”

Steve Goodman, 56

“Obama is still better than the alternatives is my opinion. But on a lot of issues, not just Israel, Obama’s trying to be a negotiator, make everybody happy. He needs to find a way to show that he’s trying hard to find a way to make sure that Israel survives and thrives.”

Adele Linn, 73

“I wouldn’t vote for Obama. I don’t believe there’s ever, ever, going to be peace. They say you give a finger and they want the hand. I ran away from Europe in 1942—I’m always worried there’s going to be another bomb, another killing, another war.”

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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