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Because We Don’t Hoard Our Culture.

On December 13, the New York City Ballet’s performance of The Nutcracker will be broadcast live to more than 500 theaters across the country.

Photo: Pari Dukovic

Because We Don’t Hoard Our Culture.

On December 13, the New York City Ballet’s performance of The Nutcracker will be broadcast live to more than 500 theaters across the country.

Photo: Pari Dukovic

Because Every Sunday Afternoon, Marjorie Eliot Turns Her Three-Bedroom Washington Heights Apartment Into a Jazz Club.

Marjorie Eliot, right, with son Rudel Drears on piano and Bob Cunningham on bass. Eliot’s son Phillip, an actor, died on a Sunday in 1992. Another son, Michael, a singer and pianist, died in 2006. To honor them, Eliot unlocks the doors of her uptown home every Sunday at 4 p.m. and turns their memory into music.

Photo: Mark Peterson

Because Just Look at the New Lincoln Center.

The Illumination Lawn designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, comprises the roof of the Lincoln restaurant and the new film center and offices.

Photo: Iwan Baan

Because Just Look at the New Lincoln Center.

The 170-foot-wide Grand Stair features informational LED screens that scroll performance information across the seven steps.

Photo: Mark Bussell/Courtesy of Lincoln Center

Because We Look Backward and Forward at the Same Time.

The High Line amphitheater, just across from a nineteenth-century tenement building on West 17th Street.

Photo: Matthew Pillsbury

Because at Jing Fong Dim Sum, You Can Stuff Yourself Silly on Rice-Noodle Rolls, Bacon-Wrapped Shrimp, and Chicken Feet, Under Bright-Blue and Fluorescent-Pink Lights, for About Fifteen Bucks.

Photo: Matthew Pillsbury/Courtesy of Bonni Benrubi Gallery

Because Freedom of Religion Extends to the Curb.

Members of Harlem’s Murid Islamic Community in America mosque praying on the sidewalk on Friday, June 17; the mosque was filled to capacity.

Photo: Viviana Peretti

Because “Great Hair.”

Photo: Pari Dukovic

Because You Run Out of Toilet Paper.

A bodega in Bushwick.

Photo: Photograph by Jessica Backhaus

Flavored

Forcella

Purists might balk, but Taïm’s flavored balls do have Israeli precedents, including a controversial sweet-potato concoction. Herb green, red pepper, and harissa are constants, but the Taïm Mobile has run tomato-Thai-basil and Kalamata olive as specials. $6.25 a sandwich; 222 Waverly Pl., nr. Perry St.; 212-691-1287.

Photo: Danny Kim/New York Magazine

Shawafel

Forcella

A house-baked pita pocket bursting at the seams with chicken shawarma and baked falafel, and perhaps inspired by the great New York deli tradition of loony combo sandwiches. $6.95 at Chickpea; several Manhattan locations.

Photo: Danny Kim/New York Magazine

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Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

Forcella

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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