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Artifact: How to Influence People

Findings from the streets, files, and hard drives of New York.

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Excerpts from a sales manual given to personal trainers at the Sports Club LA, which has two locations in Manhattan.

1. Resolving Objections
Many trainers think that “handling” objections is much like going to war with the member. This is far from the truth. You do not want to, in any way, jeopardize the great rapport you have established with the member. The relationship comes first. If or when objections occur, you must use good human relations skills in resolving objections.

What is an Objection
1. Objections are a necessary part of the sales process and should be welcomed.
2. Objections express interest on the part of the member. (Member needs more information.)
3. Objections are actually a form of a buying signal.
4. If you don’t encounter objections during the process it could spell trouble!

2. How to deal with Objections Effectively
1. Hear the objection out.
2. Pause and think before you answer.
3. Ask for elaboration.
4. Use reflective listening skills.
5. Compliment the member on the objection.

Dale Carnegie Human Relations Principles
1. Begin in a friendly way.
2. Be sympathetic with the other person’s ideas and desires.
3. Never tell a person he or she is wrong.
4. The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.
5. Make the other person happy about doing the things you suggest.

3. Here are some examples on how we could respond to different objections.
1. Member: “I think it is too expensive.”
Private Trainer: “I understand. Is there anything else besides the price that concerns you?”
or
Private Trainer: “I can appreciate that you think it’s too expensive. What are you thinking about spending?”

2. Member: “I am to [sic] busy. I’m out of town all the time.”
Private Trainer: “I can see how you can be so busy traveling for work. Can you possibly come in for a couple of sessions so I can show you a personalized training routine for when you are on the road?”

3. Member: “I want to try it on my own.”
Private Trainer: “That’s great! Do you feel that you have all the “tools” necessary for you to reach your specific goals within the time frame that you set for yourself?”

4. MOTIVE
“Now see yourself on your fishing boat in the South Pacific, 10 lbs. lighter, no back pain, relaxed, and reeling in the biggest Marlin you ever saw. You are capable of fighting with it for 1.5 hrs and you finally pull it up into the boat. WOW, what an experience.”
Evaluative Question“Isn’t this what you are dreaming about? Isn’t this your vision?”

COMMITMENT
“I’d love to be given the opportunity to work with you one-on-one. Would you consider working with me as your Private Trainer? We can get some great results together!”
Objection“It’s too expensive.”

Overcoming/Responding to Questions: “I can appreciate that you think it’s too expensive, Fred. Is there anything else about the private training services that concerns you?”

“Let me tell you, your friend Kathryn felt the same way about the cost. After all, she decided to give private training a shot. We have worked together 3 times a week for 7 months or so and she has felt and seen some great results, due to her consistency and commitment. As an example, she has lost 20 lbs. of body fat and gained 3 lbs. in lean body mass. In fact, she has also gained a true liking to both the exercise and eating strategy “lifestyle.” [sic]

“Aren’t these the things you are looking for?”

“Which day is better for you to get started? Wednesday or Friday?”

FOLLOW-UP
Send a thank you note and/or make a phone call.


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