Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

If We Can’t Be London…

Après congestion pricing, traffic types fixate on Paris.

ShareThis

With the death of Mayor Bloomberg’s London-style congestion-pricing proposal, New York’s transportation advocates have turned to Paris for inspiration. Bertrand Delanoë was elected mayor of the French capital in 2001 on a platform of creating more “civilized space” and a promise to “fight with all the means at my disposal against the harmful, ever-increasing, and unacceptable hegemony of the automobile.” Shortly after taking office, he dumped 2,000 tons of sand on the Pompidou Expressway, which runs along the rive droite, and called it Paris Plage. Complete with volleyball nets, dance classes, a climbing wall, and a floating pool, the beach attracts 4 million visitors each summer and is paid for almost entirely by sponsors. Elsewhere, Delanoë eliminated on-street parking to create lanes for Le Mobilien, a citywide bus network with real-time electronic scheduling information at the stops, physically separated to keep cars out of the way. Bikes got their own protected lanes, too, and he doubled the size of the path network. His pièce de résistance? Last summer, Paris launched Velib, the municipal bike-sharing system.

And while congestion opponents don’t understand the Francophilia—“New York City is unique, and I don’t think such a plan would work here,” says Brooklyn councilman Lew Fidler—advocates see it as a road map. “Now, it’s all about taking pavement away from automobiles and reallocating it to more efficient modes,” says Transportation Alternatives’ Paul Steely White.

Similar ideas are already in the works as part of city transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan’s implementation of Bloomberg’s PlaNYC. Last summer, the city opened a separated bike lane on a nine-block stretch of Ninth Avenue. Another, on Williamsburg’s Kent Street, got the nod last week. There are more to come, along with cordoned-off bus lanes (the rendering above shows a future Amsterdam Avenue). Also last week, work began on a new public plaza where Gansevoort Street, Ninth Avenue, and Little West 12th Street intersect; Sadik-Kahn promises more such projects, none of which requires Albany’s approval. There are no plans to turn the FDR into a beach, but the city is floating the idea of making some streets car-free this summer. The first attempt at car-free Sundays on Soho’s Prince Street died when neighbors feared it would make it too “mall-like.” Alors!

Have good intel? Send tips to intel@nymag.com.


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising