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Good Conversation

Here are five discussions to stimulate your brain this week.

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Dan and Peter Aykroyd.  

Anish Kapoor
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; 10/22 at 6:30 p.m.; 1071 Fifth Ave., at 89th St.; 212-423-3500
Anish Kapoor’s sculpture explores scale, color, and the concept of the void. On Thursday, the London-based artist — whose 24-ton installation Memory opens this week at the Guggenheim — discusses his work, with reception to follow.

John Patrick Shanley
Rubin Museum of Art; 10/23 at 7 p.m.; 150 W. 17th St., nr. Seventh Ave.; 212-620-5000
While we would never volunteer to be psychoanalyzed onstage, well-known personalities Charlie Kaufman, David Byrne, and Billy Corgan have all done so for the Rubin Museum's dialogue series, presented as part of their Carl Jung exhibit. This Friday, John Patrick Shanley, the Pulitzer Prize–winning dramatist of Doubt, is the one in the hot seat.

Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
Symphony Space; 10/25 at 1 p.m.; 2537 Broadway, at 95th St.; 212-864-1414
It’s technically an event for middle schoolers, but adults, too, will be entertained when Barry and Pearson hold forth on the latest installment in their best-selling prequels to Peter Pan, Peter and the Sword of Mercy. The event includes a book signing and a performance by Tony award winner Jim Dale.

Susie Essman and Joy Behar or
Dan and Peter Aykroyd

92nd Street Y; 10/25 at 7:30 p.m.; 1395 Lexington Ave., nr. 92nd St.; 212-415-5500
Choose between funny men or funny ladies on Sunday at the Y. Ghostbusters alum Dan Aykroyd and his dad, Peter (author of A History of Ghosts), discuss scary things, and comediennes Joy Behar and Susie Essman dispense unsolicited advice and peddle Essman’s new book, What Would Susie Say?: Bullsh*t Wisdom About Love, Life and Comedy.

Ira Glass and Etgar Keret
Celeste Bartos Forum at the NYPL ; 10/28 at 7 p.m.; Fifth Ave., at 42nd St.; 212-930-0730
As the host of This American Life, Ira Glass takes us on a tour through the murky cultural depths of our great land. This time, he turns his gaze on Israel, interviewing internationally acclaimed writer Etgar Keret, who will mark the occasion by debuting a new short story.


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