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Vision Festival, June 20-30

Darius Jones Trio
The Local 269; 6/21 at 8:30 p.m..; 269 E. Houston St., at Suffolk St.; 212-228-9874
An alto saxophonist with a brash sound and a furious purpose, Jones burst onto the scene last year with his debut album, Man'ish Boy. The saxophone trio is his natural habitat, and here he's joined by his most frequent collaborators: bassist Adam Lane and drummer Jason Nazary.

Lowest Common Denominator
The Local 269; 6/21 at 9:30 p.m..; 269 E. Houston St., at Suffolk St.; 212-228-9874
The adventurous saxophonist Tim Berne is a guru to young jazz players, but to the mainstream audience, he's a "huh?" Here he plays with trumpeter Herb Robertson, electronics jockey Matt Mitchell, and drummer Dan Weiss in a wide-open quartet.

Muhal Richard Abrams
Abrons Arts Center; 6/24 at 7 p.m.; 466 Grand St., nr. Pitt St.; 212-598-0400
The 79-year-old pianist is the godfather of Chicago free jazz, having founded the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians in a swirl of mid-'60s black politics, community activism, and experimental music. Since those early days, Abrams has forged a legacy as both a fearsome pianist and a generous mentor, and now, as the Vision Festival's lifetime-achievement honoree, he headlines a program of acolytes and old friends.

Tribute to Sirone
Abrons Arts Center; 6/26 at 11:30 p.m.; 466 Grand St., nr. Pitt St.; 212-598-0400
Saxophonist Charles Gayle leads a tribute to the late bassist/composer Sirone in the most fitting way possible: by convening an ensemble made up almost exclusively of avant-garde bassists. Two basses will be on stage at all times and that number could swell to as much as five; count on a beautiful cacophony of bows, picks, and slaps.

David S. Ware Trio
Abrons Arts Center; 6/27 at 9:30 p.m.; 466 Grand St., nr. Pitt St.; 212-598-0400
In the 90s, Ware's Quartet was one of the baddest units in jazz, whipping standards like "Autumn Leaves" into a dark torrent of focused chaos. Last decade, the incendiary saxophonist fell mostly silent due to health problems, but after a kidney transplant in 2009, Ware is back in action, but performing infrequently. Take the opportunity to catch him here in all his squawking, swooning, ranting glory.

Eric Benson writes about jazz at the blog Inverted Garden.


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