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Arianne Cohen

June 11, 2007 |
A Drug Dealer

With data on petty drug dealers, the economist Steven Levitt has taught us that there is an abundant supply of people willing to work in the drug industry at near the minimum wage.

June 11, 2007 |
A Private Investigator

Lawyers, insurance companies, and private citizens hire McKeever for a base rate of $100 an hour.

June 11, 2007 |
A Diner

The Upper East Side institution is caught between customers expecting low prices and ever-rising food and staff costs, made more difficult by a giant menu.

June 11, 2007 |
A Soup Kitchen

A fifth of the city’s food pantries and kitchens have budgets of zero—they run on food donations alone.

June 11, 2007 |
A Yoga Studio

The most-profitable yoga studios are efficient: They fill four to five classes daily, plus private classes.

June 11, 2007 |
A Sex Shop

The high-end sex shop buys from tiny artisan-type vendors, making for an upscale clientele and an average 63 percent markup.

June 11, 2007 |
A Discount Store

The dense city’s crowds of customers mean that goods can turn over faster than anyplace else in America

June 11, 2007 |
A Pizza Place

Nina’s is a small Upper East Side eatery, dependent on family labor to turn an extremely modest profit from serving 300 meals a week in its 24-seat dining room.

June 11, 2007 |
A Copy Shop

Those small, ubiquitous photocopy stores are very lucrative, and can be launched with no seed money—just rent.

June 11, 2007 |
A Four-Star Restaurant

Cheap rent lets Nobu work a lower-price, higher-volume game than many of its top-of-the-line brethren: The median check, including alcohol, is $75.

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