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Arianne Cohen

June 11, 2007 |
A Diner

The Upper East Side institution is caught between customers expecting low prices and ever-rising food and staff costs, made more difficult by a giant menu.

June 11, 2007 |
A Soup Kitchen

A fifth of the city’s food pantries and kitchens have budgets of zero—they run on food donations alone.

June 11, 2007 |
A Yoga Studio

The most-profitable yoga studios are efficient: They fill four to five classes daily, plus private classes.

June 11, 2007 |
A Sex Shop

The high-end sex shop buys from tiny artisan-type vendors, making for an upscale clientele and an average 63 percent markup.

June 11, 2007 |
A Discount Store

The dense city’s crowds of customers mean that goods can turn over faster than anyplace else in America

June 11, 2007 |
A Pizza Place

Nina’s is a small Upper East Side eatery, dependent on family labor to turn an extremely modest profit from serving 300 meals a week in its 24-seat dining room.

June 11, 2007 |
A Copy Shop

Those small, ubiquitous photocopy stores are very lucrative, and can be launched with no seed money—just rent.

June 11, 2007 |
A Four-Star Restaurant

Cheap rent lets Nobu work a lower-price, higher-volume game than many of its top-of-the-line brethren: The median check, including alcohol, is $75.

June 11, 2007 |
A Private School

Horace Mann, one of New York’s top private schools, educates 1,605 K–12 students, a fifth of whom receive some financial aid.

June 11, 2007 |
A Department Store

Macy’s Herald Square flagship, owned by Federated, profits from the sheer volume of 9,000 pedestrians who walk through Herald Square during a peak hour, a third of whom enter Macy’s.

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