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James Surowiecki

April 12, 1999 | The Bottom Line
Chase, the Rumor

Would a Chase-Merrill merger make sense for consumers, or for the market? And does it even matter, since megabanks get to do whatever they want?

April 5, 1999 | The Bottom Line
Hip-Hopped Up

What's that sound? Urban-music titles are raising the volume at the newsstand -- and agitating to become the "Rolling Stone" of the future.

March 29, 1999 | The Bottom Line
I.P.Oh?

Sure, when Goldman, Sachs goes public, the firm's partners will get obscenely wealthy. But the real beauty part? They won't have to give up any control.

March 1, 1999 | The Bottom Line
Bonds and Domination

Forget Ken Starr: The president's old nemesis the bond market has come back to haunt him -- with a big assist from Japanese investors who are bringing their money back home.

February 15, 1999 | The Bottom Line
Bubble Wrap

When the Net-stock bubble bursts -- thanks, in part, to the increasing flood of dubious IPOs (hello, Prodigy!) -- must serious tech stocks get hit, too?

February 8, 1999 | Feature
Taking Stock

Drug companies have discovered women's health care in a big way. Now investors are asking, Is there a Prozac or Viagra in the offing?

October 19, 1998 | The Bottom Line
One Untrue Thing

We were supposed to love the 'noncyclicals' category -- Disney, Gillette, Coke -- for better or for worse. So why are these market darlings taking such nasty full-body blows?

August 24, 1998 | The Bottom Line
Hoarse Whisperers

As investment bankers lose their grip on the market, why are so many indie investors obediently reacting to their pronouncements? And why are telco mergers being ignored?

August 10, 1998 | The Bottom Line
Mad Money

Track the Dow for a few hours, and you'll get vertigo. But look beyond the skittering ticker for a minute, and you'll find a thread of logic you can hang on to. Really.

August 3, 1998 | The Bottom Line
Money Machine

Michael Dell is worth $11 billion, and his company has one of the hottest tech stocks around. But unlike a lot of its high-flying brethren, Dell Computer is the real thing.

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