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Peter Rainer

December 22, 2003 | Movie Review
Down-Homer

Cold Mountain is a Civil War Odyssey that drenches the South in blood and beauty. Lord of the Rings restores our faith in trilogies.

December 15, 2003 | Movie Review
Acting Her Age

Even in a comic cop-out like Something’s Gotta Give, Diane Keaton proves she’s not too old to be a star (or to bed Jack Nicholson).

December 8, 2003 | Movie Review
Zen Palette

Director Edward Zwick gives The Last Samurai a coat of deep-thought spirituality—and turns Tom Cruise into a haunted swordsman.

December 1, 2003 | Movie Review
Ode to Joie

The Triplets of Belleville is a jazzy celebration of animated action. Tommy Lee Jones and Cate Blanchett enliven a generic Wild West in The Missing.

November 17, 2003 | Movie Review
Naval Gazing

In the winning Master and Commander, Peter Weir and Russell Crowe keep the action contemplative. The Matrix Revolutions goes boom.

November 10, 2003 | Movie Review
Candy Corn

Love Actually drenches British wit in Hollywood treacle. Elf is a Hallmark card, too—but at least it has the dependably funny Will Ferrell.

November 3, 2003 | Movie Review
Identity Crisis

In The Human Stain—adapted from Philip Roth’s book—Anthony Hopkins plays a professor who has hidden his race from his family and peers.

October 27, 2003 | Movie Review
Cheap Shots

In Elephant, Gus Van Sant aims for an objective look at teen shootings in America, but his art-house approach is way too cool for school.

October 20, 2003 | Movie Review
Holiday Reunion

Pieces of April, about a dysfunctional family that reconciles over Thanksgiving dinner, breathes life into a tired premise.

October 13, 2003 | Movie Review
No Pain, No Gain

Clint Eastwood’s Mystic River is suffused with lives ruined by violence; in Kill Bill, Quentin Tarantino looks violence in the eye—and cackles.

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