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John Homans

July 14, 2003 | The Book Review
Electric Ladies' Man

Benjamin Franklin, genius and rake, the first American superstar, proves more than a match for Walter Isaacson in a new biography.

June 23, 2003 | The Book Review
Hill of Dreams

Living History comes up short on gossip and revenge, but why blame Hillary for being a politician?

June 9, 2003 | The Book Review
Sex, What a Pity

Candace Bushnell helped invent the world she describes in her new novel—so why does Trading Up feel like it was written by someone from Des Moines?

May 26, 2003 | The Book Review
Mortal Splendor

The depth and richness of Norman Rush’s second novel, Mortals, give him his own shelf in the canon.

May 12, 2003 | The Book Review
Reading Roone's

By changing TV--first ABC Sports, then ABC News--Roone Arledge changed the way we see the world (and invented a host of stars, from Geraldo to Barbara Walters, besides).

April 21, 2003 | The Book Review
Descent of Man

James Frey’s barroom machismo is the key to a swaggering recovery in his new memoir of addiction.

March 31, 2003 | The Book Review
Pulling the Plug

From the wilderness (the Adirondacks) comes a voice (Bill McKibben’s Enough) telling us that the end is near unless we repent (technologically). Scientists aren’t likely to listen.

March 10, 2003 | The Book Review
The Three Wives Club

Jennifer Haigh’s first novel, Mrs. Kimble, breathes new life into an old American archetype—the romantic con man.

March 3, 2003 | Feature
Ad Behavior

Legendary adman George Lois, whose new book, $ellebrity, is published this month, created some of the most memorable campaigns of the past 45 years, from “I want my Maypo” to “I want my MTV.” His Esquire covers—featuring Nixon in lipstick, Muhammad Ali as Saint Sebastian, and Andy Warhol drowning in a can of Campbell’s soup—inspired a generation of editors and designers. In the process, he helped midwife the birth—say it ain’t so, George—of modern celebrity culture. And along the way, no one had more fun. A talk with a modern master (Bronx accent not included).

March 3, 2003 | Feature
Ad Behavior

Legendary adman George Lois, whose new book, $ellebrity, is published this month, created some of the most memorable campaigns of the past 45 years, from “I want my Maypo” to “I want my MTV.” His Esquire covers—featuring Nixon in lipstick, Muhammad Ali as Saint Sebastian, and Andy Warhol drowning in a can of Campbell’s soup—inspired a generation of editors and designers. In the process, he helped midwife the birth—say it ain’t so, George—of modern celebrity culture. And along the way, no one had more fun. A talk with a modern master (Bronx accent not included).

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