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David Amsden

February 20, 2006 | Feature
Happy Days

Eighties party icon Susanne Bartsch returns to save nightlife from bottle service and Paris Hilton.

February 6, 2006 | Book/Author Profile
Impatient Patient: James McManus

In Positively Fifth Street, James McManus turned a week at the World Series of Poker into a rambunctious existential exploration of greed and family, with an epically seedy murder tossed in. His new book, Physical: An American Checkup, takes an equally gonzo approach to the world of medicine.

January 9, 2006 | Feature
Bad Kids Inc.

What’s to be done about out-of-control teenagers? The man who gave us Citi Habitats has a plan to turn a parental self-help group into a company as popular and profitable as Weight Watchers.

December 26, 2005 | Intelligencer
The Bear Necessities

In the cold, dark forests of New Jersey, Dean Goldberg faced his fear—the fear of no bears.

December 26, 2005 | Reasons to Love New York
Because on Any Night of the Week, You Can Go to a Naked College-Dorm Party, Wrestle with a Topless Dominatrix, or Suck a Few Toes

123 reasons to love New York.

September 5, 2005 | The Book Review
Fly Like an Ego

In praise of self-indulgence.

July 4, 2005 | Feature
Man-Hunting With the High-School Dream Girls

A night out with Sophie, Audrey, and Lana, teenagers in love with feeling grown-up and on the prowl for (much) older men. Out of the cradle and into the clubs.

April 4, 2005 | Feature
The Cheerful Transgressive

As his new retrospective at ICP makes clear, photographer Larry Clark was hot for teen decadence before the rest of the culture caught on.

February 14, 2005 | Fashion
Dynasty

At 72, with his business on fire and the White House calling, Oscar de la Renta is at the peak of his power. Now if only he can work out the line of succession.

January 17, 2005 | Feature
The Teenage Economy

In a city obsessed with money, kids are, too. And the choices parents make have powerful effects on the separate, sometimes cruel, world of adolescence.

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