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Steve Fishman

May 8, 2006 | Features
Kissels Of Death

One brother, the good son, high-powered Merrill Lynch banker, was bludgeoned to death by his wife in Hong Kong after being fed a narcotic milk shake—by his own young daughter. Another brother, the bad son, stole millions of dollars, then was discovered bound and stabbed in the back in his Greenwich mansion.

April 18, 2006 | Intelligencer
Hayley's Hate Mail

Murder victim Andrew Kissel's wife dreams of pummeling him to death.

March 6, 2006
The Lost Soprano

Lillo Brancato lived his dream. He played tough guys in the movies with De Niro and did a season with James Gandolfini’s crew. Then, on a dark, drug-fueled night in Yonkers, the gun went off, the cop was dead, and the dream became all too real.

January 9, 2006 | Intelligencer
Anger Management

Why TWU honcho Roger Toussaint still blames Bloomberg—and still believes striking was the only possible course.

December 12, 2005 | Profile
Howard Stern in Space

Coming to you via satellite, a brave new radio world, from the once and future king of all media......featuring the Craptacular.

October 24, 2005 | Profile
How New York's Shock Jockette Got Supersized

She wants it big. She wants it Wendy.

September 19, 2005 | Feature
The Boy Who Wouldn't Be King

A son who craves his father’s love. A father who believes in his own immortality. The intimate story of the clash that rocked the Murdoch dynasty.

June 27, 2005 | Profile
Mommy's Little Con Man

When NYU senior Hakan Yalincak was arrested and put in jail after attempting to cash a forged $25 million check, his mother, Jackie, tearfully supplied a sketchy, convoluted explanation for everything. And when, a month later, she too was arrested for fraud, it seemed she’d taught her son everything she knew.

June 13, 2005 | Feature
He Got Life

David Wong was a nobody, an illegal immigrant who’d drifted aimlessly through Chinatown to prison. Then, accused of a murder he didn’t commit, he became a symbol of injustice and an admired man. Now he’s on the verge of freedom—and in danger of losing everything again.

April 25, 2005 | Profile
Hell's Kitchen

Marine Lieutenant Ilario Pantano made it out of a tough neighborhood to Horace Mann and Goldman Sachs. But 9/11 reactivated his inner warrior and brought him to Iraq. Now, charged with murder, he’s in a different kind of hell.

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