New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

ARCHIVES

Book Features Archive

September 18, 2006
Curious Figure: Mark Haddon

His new follow-up, A Spot of Bother, follows a surprisingly ordinary father, George, sent into a panic by a patch of eczema he’s convinced is terminal cancer.

August 28, 2006
Off the Shelf: Jennifer Egan

The author of the new novel The Keep on five books in her library that have influenced her—and why Henry James is so hard to read in New York.

August 14, 2006
Sticking Her Neck Out

Nora Ephron on midlife, postfeminism, and the work she’s had done.

July 24, 2006
Perusing the Bookshelf of the Undulating Curve of Shifting Expectations!

Our books buzz and backlash report.

July 17, 2006
Read and Approved: Eclectic Beach Fare

Still looking for a summer book that isn’t 100 percent trashy? Perhaps even one that’s 100 percent non-trashy (say, on Spinoza)? Here are five new(ish) titles that we’re particularly enthused about.

June 12, 2006
Six Degrees of Paula Fox

Advance praise finds its way to book jackets in many ways—some meticulously planned, some random—but mostly, as an executive at HarperCollins admits, “it’s logrolling, pure and simple.”

June 5, 2006
In the People’s Court: David Feige

After law school, David Feige turned down Dewey Ballantine for a $29,500 public-defender job representing indigent clients who faced everything from trespassing misdemeanors to murder charges. Now he’s written Indefensible, a book that makes the Bronx Criminal Court look like Kafka’s Castle.

May 29, 2006
War Novelist: Scott Anderson

Q&A with the sometime war correspondent and new fiction writer.

May 29, 2006
Influences: Roger Angell

Roger Angell’s new book, Let Me Finish, is a memoir by way of essays. In it he vividly, heartbreakingly traces 86 years as a New Yorker and nearly as many working at The New Yorker.

May 22, 2006
By Our Contributors

How are you supposed to cultivate sources like Alec without doing something slightly unethical?” Kate Simon asks herself in Deborah Schoeneman’s first novel, 4% Famous.

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising