New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

March 7, 2005

ShareThis

Hill’s Crest
I found Jennifer Senior’s “The Once and Future President Clinton” [February 21] fascinating, particularly the line that invites one to consider the weirdness of a Hillary candidacy: Hill as prez and Bubba as houseboy. I think on that basis alone Americans would soundly reject her. But let’s cut to the chase, despite all the thronging crowds screaming in adulation: Hillary will be placed under a magnifying glass as never before. Her record—from Wellesley to the White House—will be scrutinized (along with the Clintons’ devious doings). I may be wrong, but I have some faith that the American people are not so easily deceived by this rather dangerous personality.
—Richard Stanaro, London, England

Perhaps I am her energized base, but after reading the article by Jennifer Senior I am absolutely giddy at the prospect of a run by Hillary Clinton. Bring her on.
—Mark Porter, San Antonio, Texas

The Democrats have been down on their luck, and the Clinton turnaround is a welcome development. President Clinton used to joke that when we elected him we got two for the price of one. I think the prospect of an imminent female president is very realistic. This story isn’t over yet.
—Steven A. Ludsin, East Hampton, N.Y.

Rocking the Vote
Kurt Andersen ["The Imperial City: When Good News Feels Bad," February 21] continues to tell the obvious truth about New York liberals—and, in the process, pushes partisans from both sides toward a more honest dialogue. Bravo!
—Robert Ward, Delmar, N.Y.

Something has bothered me for a long time about the left: It has always been willing—if not actually eager—to throw in with people who want us dead, and I can’t help but think there is an inherent moral failing in their philosophy that leads them to do so.
—John Jontry, Indianapolis, Indiana

Exposing the liberal movement’s wholesale commitment to Bush’s demise even at the sacrifice of patriotism and intellectual honesty is an important step. I am a conservative and an Evangelical. I find it disappointing that Mr. Andersen is not sophisticated enough to imagine someone like me as anything other than a simpleton who blindly supports Bush. I listen to Rush Limbaugh not because I see the world only in black and white but because there are too few honest pieces like Mr. Andersen’s in the liberal media.
—Douglas R. Morrissey, Lancaster, Pa.

The vote in Iraq was a success, and George Bush is responsible. My liberal friends, family, and fellow New Yorkers: I’m sorry. Your point, Mr. Andersen, is right on the money. Only one request, s’il vous plaît: Don’t call us French.
—Maria Dellaporte, Long Beach, N.Y.

Kurt Andersen writes of a difficult choice concerning Iraq: “Either we hope for the vindication of Bush’s risky, very possibly reckless policy, or we are in a de facto alliance with the killers of American soldiers and Iraqi civilians.” This is coarse and brutal reductionism, which despite its falsity captures very well the Zeitgeist of our increasingly coarsened and brutalized political discourse. There is a broad range of possible outcomes in Iraq beyond Andersen’s blinkered Bush-versus-Zarqawi scenario. It’s a pity that a fine writer like Mr. Andersen has narrowed his view of reality in Iraq to such a false and primitive dichotomy.
—Chris Floyd, Oxford, England

Get Milk
We are very concerned that the forces of homophobia appear to be gaining ground in both an unjustified legal effort and a sophisticated media campaign to oppose the innovative mission of New York City’s Harvey Milk High School ["The Harvey Milk High School Has No Right to Exist. Discuss," by John Colapinto, February 7]. Mayor Bloomberg and the city Board of Education were right to establish an institution to serve the academic needs of gay and lesbian teenagers seeking to complete their high-school education in a setting free from the bigotry, discrimination, and acts of violence that gays and lesbians have had to endure in the public-school system. All public schools must treat all students fairly. Stop throwing stones at these kids. Stop trying to undermine the Harvey Milk High School.
—Russell and Kimora Lee Simmons, Manhattan

Letters to the Editor may be edited for space and clarity. To submit a letter:

Mail to:
Letters to the Editor
New York Magazine
444 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022-6999

E-mail
NYletters@newyorkmag.com. Please include a daytime phone number.

Discuss now
Post your thoughts on our discussion board.


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising