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Table of Contents


May 11, 1998 Issue

"It’s considered radical to send someone to a modified Ornish program. But to crack their chest open to do a bypass, that’s considered conservative."
-- Stephen Josephson, "Medicine Goes Mental"

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FEATURES
Medicine Goes Mental
BY HENRY DREHER

Meditation can help cure cancer? Don’t laugh. Studies show that mind-body techniques can help, and even New York’s medical Establishment is seeing the light. This week, Beth Israel hosts a conference where top doctors will talk with the Dalai Lama. But does the New Age belong in the OR?

Hollywood Joe
BY RENE CHUN

Joey Buttafuoco wants you to know that he’s doin’ great. That Mary Jo is, too. That his public-access show in Hollywood is just the beginning -- feature-film roles, celebrity appearances. In the meantime, he’s working at an auto-body shop in L.A. The perpetual punch line speaks.

Killer App
BY ELISA DECARIO

A murder confesses in an Internet mailing to 200 people. One, a New York writer, calls the cops. The alleged killer is arrested. And the group is horrified -- much more about the snitch than about the death.

Every Inch a Star
BY HELEN EISENBACH

Drag-as-drama is so 1993. But John Cameron Mitchell -- author and star of Hedwig and the Angry Inch -- has, against the mainstream tide, carved out a cult following. And he’s as big with East Side matrons as with punks.

Eat to Your Heart’s Content
BY KAREN ANGEL

Scared just thinking of the dietary disasters looming in your takeout dinner? You should be -- unless you’re ordering from these great services.

GOTHAM
Cops and the public-school curriculum; football settles down indoors; a tattooists' coming-out
GOTHAM STYLE Bugs and bees get chic

DEPARTMENTS
The Image
BY BARBARA LIPPERT

Spike Lee condemns marketing that preys on inner-city kids; he also makes ads aimed at inner-city kids. Does he see a conflict? Nah.

Media
BY ALEX WILLIAMS

Steve Brill says he’s going to be the tough new cop patrolling the precincts of American journalism. But will anybody obey?

The Insatiable Critic
BY GAEL GREENE

Peking-duck pizza? At One3, it’s not blasphemy, it’s just a great meal

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Geomancy’s seating; a prefab pareo; a self-absorbing tote

Sales & Bargains
BY ONDINE COHANE

Mother country: Delights for her day, from spa treatments to Hermès’s unheard-of sale

THE ARTS
Movies
BY DAVID DENBY

Basketball diaries: He Got Game jumps between easy slickness and powerful intensity

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

The Judas Kiss is hardly Oscar-worthy; High Society has feet of clay

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Chaim Soutine’s haunted paintings at the Jewish Museum

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Russian to judgment: Do Valery Gergiev and the Kirov live up to the international hype?

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Life on the street: Witness to the Mob’s homicidal rats break down the old code

Pop Music
BY BILLY ALTMAN

Run out the strings: A clutch of aging guitar gods comes back, with mixed results

CUE
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Intelligencer
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