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Table of Contents


August 24, 1998 Issue

"The next hundred years will be the age of biology. This is where the next information revolution will be."
-- Dr. Lance Liotta, of the National Cancer Institute, "The Age of Discovery"

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FEATURES
Cool for Sale
BY NANCY JO SALES

Their parties are the ones you read about on "Page Six" -- Puffy dropped by, Mariah took a banquette -- but you won't find the names Justin Salguero, Shawn Regruto, and Richie Akiva in boldface. That's about to change, as these young party promoters and their friends leverage carefully cultivated connections into a line of clothing, a record deal, and more. Tomorrow's moguls are planning their businesses on the dance floor. Get ready for Justin-Shawn-and-Richie: The Empire.

Re-Porn
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

Closing 142 of the city's porn establishments may seem like a good, middle-class-friendly idea. But Rudy's anti-smut crusade may have unintended consequences. Where will the porn emporia resurface?

Hello, Marylou
BY CHARLOTTE HAYS

Ten months ago, blonde, bouncy heiress Marylou Whitney shocked society by marrying John Hendrickson, a cherubic Alaskan 40 years her junior. Since then, he has helped her sell 15,000 acres in the Adirondacks and become president of Whitney Industries. Against all odds, it's love.

The Old Homestead
BY MARK JACOBSON

Forty-three years after the author's family moved to Queens, his widowed mother put The House up for sale. Even as waves of immigrants have made the neighborhood hard to recognize, the force of memory persists.

GOTHAM
The bill for "disabled" kids' education; rats in Red Hook
GOTHAM STYLE The shrinking cell phone; bubbly in Brooklyn; stylish softball

DEPARTMENTS
The Bottom Line
BY JAMES SUROWIECKI

Ralph and Abby's powerful effect on the markets. Plus: deconstructing the telco mergers

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

As Rupert Murdoch's marriage crumbles, will he lose his grip on his empire?

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

Tavern on the Green's food still can't match the fantasy setting

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Kate Spade computes; Birkenstock waterproofs; time mobilizes

Sales & Bargains
BY ONDINE COHANE

Leather shoes for him, tennis dresses for her, and Barneys discounts for the whole family

THE ARTS
Movies
BY DAVID DENBY

The malicious Unmade Beds captures the signal horrors of the New York single life

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

Donald Margulies's Collected Stories revived, recast, redundant

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Sound restorer Ward Marston's new label brings music back from the LP graveyard

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Susan Marshall's latest piece holds up a mirror to our confused relationships

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Dean Martin upstages Frank and Sammy in HBO's The Rat Pack

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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