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Table of Contents


October 5, 1998 Issue

"It's been hard not to look lately. You go into Citibank and they have all those stock quotes going by your face as you're standing in line. It's the hearth of the nineties."
-- Steve Hoffman, Investor, from "City of Traders"

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GROUND RULES: Not everything in every issue appears on our website. If it is available online, the article title appears below as acolored, underlined "hot link," which you can click on to read the full text; ifthe article title below is black, the full text of the article is notavailable online. For more information on getting copies or reprints of articlesthat aren't on our web site, call New York Magazine's Information ServicesDepartment at 212-508-0755.

FEATURES
City of Traders

President, shmesident. As the Dow has rocketed and plummeted in the past few weeks, New York's market obsession has reached a crescendo. Chris Smith on how the mind-set (if not the bank accounts) the boom created is a permanent part of the city's landscape. James Surowiecki on the "irrational feedback loop" we're living in. Alan Deutschman on a fund manager who bet big on Russia -- and lost. Plus: how New York business, real estate, luxuries, and government would weather a bear market.

Requiem for a Restaurant
BY MERYL GORDON

Glenn Bernbaum, the gruff gatekeeper of Mortimers, left his building to a hospital, and his patrons bereft. Conspicuously rude, covertly generous, adored by his beau monde clientele, Bernbaum hosted the longest-running dinner party on Lexington Avenue.

Über-coats
BY SALLY SINGER

For New Yorkers, a coat does double duty as a coat of arms -- an individual statement that must travel stylishly from boardroom to film set, gallery opening to after-hours haunt. We asked a fashionable dozen to flaunt (and explicate) their choices from the fall outerwear collections.

GOTHAM
The Yankees' fear of success; Webster Hall's police state
GOTHAM STYLE Lacroix decorates; Picasso chairs; sample sales with sustenance

DEPARTMENTS
The National Interest
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

After the video, can anything stop the overhyped, overheated pursuit of the president?

The City Politic
BY CHARLES KAISER

Gay voters agonize over sometime supporter Al D'Amato

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

Jean-Georges Vongerichten is as brilliant downtown as up

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Shape-shifting: sharp knives, curly chairs, fresh scents

Sales & Bargains
BY ONDINE COHANE

Soft touch: kilims, silks, chenilles, and velvets

THE ARTS
Movies
BY DAVID DENBY

Despite a roster of international talent, Ronin is an empty exercise in noir

Books
BY WALTER KIRN

Philip Roth's Communist leanings: a winning novel that brims with brash Bolshevik talk and singular if familiar characters

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

A Streetcar to remember; Art flourishes with a new cast

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

A sublime Dutch survey; a spotty set of Tiffany glass

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Touching Evil outstrips TV horror's usual grimness and gore

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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