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March 29, 1999 Issue

"Anti-gay jokes are almost encouraged. I don't think the straight community on Wall Street wants to know you're gay. I don't see full acceptance in my lifetime, and I'm 31."
--Robert Fenyk, former Merrill Lynch broker, from "Dead-End Street"

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FEATURES
Dead-End Street
BY ALAN DEUTSCHMAN

While tolerance has found its way into most of New York's top industries, "don't ask, don't tell" is still the rule on Wall Street, where thousands of gay and lesbian finance professionals are painstakingly closeted. In the locker-room atmosphere of the trading floor and the country-club world of mergers and acquisitions, gays endure an institutional homophobia more reminiscent of the fifties than the nineties to protect those fabulous bonuses.

May You Be With the Force
PEG TYRE

Cops in big trouble turn to flamboyant Queens attorney Marvyn Kornberg -- even though their own union trashes him. Now he tackles the case of his career, defending Justin Volpe, accused of torturing Abner Louima.

Be His Guest
BY MERYL GORDON

From red-lacquered Ruby Foo's to Blue Water Grill, Steve Hanson's seven restaurants may be star-challenged, but the customers don't care.

The Real Rounder
BY STEVE FISHMAN

In 1997, ESPN dubbed Stuey Ungar "The Comeback Kid" after the scrawny son of a Lower East Side bookmaker won the World Series of Poker for the third time. A year later, he died alone in a run-down Vegas hotel. A glimpse into the briefly charmed life of a born gambler.

GOTHAM
Cravath, Swaine gets happy; kosher sex gets happierGOTHAM STYLE A new Italian on Madison; the bride wore hemp

DEPARTMENTS
The Body Politic
BY LAWRENCE D. MASS, M.D.

The medical establishment's brush-off of hepatitis C recalls the early years of AIDS

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES SUROWIECKI

How Goldman can go public without losing its storied privacy

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Michael Graves's light touch; DDC Labs' links-ready shoes

Smart City
BY JEREMY GERARD

Bland banned: eight hip restaurants where your kids will be welcome. Plus: where dogs run free

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Outlet-mall markdowns on officewear (but just for him)

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Clint Eastwood's in good-guy mode for True Crime

Books
BY WALTER KIRN

George Stephanopoulos, still spinning (with an assist from Zoloft)

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

David Hare's riveting Middle East monologue; Durang unravels

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Two new shows of inspiring medieval art at the Met

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

José Carreras returns to the opera stage in Sly, with mixed results

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Ben Kingsley plays a small-m martyr in The Confession

Pop Music
BY CHRIS NORRIS

Jazz chanteuse Cassandra Wilson channels Miles Davis

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
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