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April 19, 1999 Issue

"Winston Churchill was a great man, but when the war was over, they got rid of him. Well, the war is over, and if there were a way to get rid of Rudy, they'd get rid of him today."
--Political consultant Hank Sheinkopf, from "Mr. Unpopularity"

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FEATURES
Mr. Unpopularity
BY CRAIG HOROWITZ

Even before Amadou Diallo's violent death galvanized his critics, Mayor Rudy Giuliani seemed to be hard at work alienating New Yorkers who had reelected him by a landslide, deeply grateful for his success in taming the city's mean streets. Consumed by petty squabbles and increasingly isolated, Rudy has paid little more than lip service to issues beyond crime, squandering the political capital built up by his astonishing early achievements and creating a crisis in City Hall. Where did it all go wrong?

Spree's Wild Ride
BY ERIC KONIGSBERG

When he attacked his coach during practice last season, Latrell Sprewell became a symbol for all that's wrong with the younger generation of basketball players: overpaid, selfish, angry, uncoachable. But a succession of Sprewell's previous coaches found the Knicks' newest star to be a superb and dedicated basketball student. He's also a committed (if unconventional) family man. A story of rebellion, Rashomon, and, perhaps, redemption in the modern NBA.

Religious Differences
BY ALEXANDRA LANGE

A strict Orthodox education at his Long Island yeshiva made Nathan Englander long for escape. The young writer found it, unexpectedly, in Jerusalem, charting the journey in touching, funny stories about religion's impracticalities in a secular world.

Dancing Queen
BY VANESSA GRIGORIADIS

Once, she ruled an international empire of nineteen nightclubs -- most of which closed in the belt-tightening of the early nineties. But a 10,000-Dow stock market has lured the eternally red-haired, 69-year-old Regine back to Park Avenue with a new club, Rage, and a new Jimmyz in Miami. Is there still an audience for lamé, leather, and Lucite?

GOTHAM
Why is the Journal in bed with NBC?; Rem Koolhaas takes Times Square
GOTHAM STYLE The hippest cooler; white jeans replace no-rinse

DEPARTMENTS
Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Booker culture: How guest bookers have changed news culture

Cityside
BY JOHN LOMBARDI

Cutting a deal with the Feds, John Gotti Jr. finally became his own man

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

No waffling: The Belgian invasion

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Tough-gal hats, snappy slickers

Smart City
BY ROBIN RAISFELD

Green dreams: Vegetables find their inner gourmet

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Spring into sandals, with a discount foot-beautifying treatment

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Drew Barrymore's goofy sensuality floats Never Been Kissed

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

The all-American lyricism of Susannah sounds small at the Met

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Mark Morris calls on some friendly stars for two new dances

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

The big chill: Kevin Spacey's stunning, ice-cold Iceman

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Swing Vote imagines America after the anti-abortionists win out

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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