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May 17, 1999 Issue

"In Colorado, there's nothing going on -- those kids just download a bunch of stuff from the Internet and watch TV -- there's nothing to look at but suburbs."
--Ted Rourke, age 18, from "It's a Teen Thing"

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FEATURES
It's a Teen Thing

In the weeks after Columbine, the focus has come home, as parents agonize over their own elusive children. Mark Jacobson gauges the meaning of the massacre to his wired kids. Kids tell Nancy Jo Sales why it can't happen here; New York is much more tolerant of outsiders. And Michael Wolff reflects on the media culture's generation gap.

Funny Girl
BY JENNIFER SENIOR

Veronica Geng was known for her sharp editing, her sultry persona, and her biting humor pieces, just collected in Love Trouble. By the time she was diagnosed with cancer, she had either quit or been pushed from her sixteen-year job at The New Yorker and had cut off many of her friends. Still, they rallied around Geng, as prickly in dying as she was in life.

If You Build It . . .
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

One day in the coming weeks, a horde of pols will crowd the Farley Post Office for the most eagerly awaited unveiling in 35 years -- the new Penn Station, shown here for the first time. Now that we're on a roll, what about the airport link? The waterfront? The Second Avenue subway?

Everybody's All-American
BY GAEL GREENE

Bored with foie gras towers and Peking-duck empanadas, the Insatiable Critic finds herself craving deviled eggs. Biscuits. Pot roast. American cooking, in all its fresh, regional, unfussy glory, is making a comeback at places like Wild Blue and Larry Forgione's revived Coach House. A cause for celebration.

GOTHAM
The tumult at Vibe Ventures; U.S. Customs agents get carded
GOTHAM STYLE Beads are back; so are Tretorns

DEPARTMENTS
Cityscape
BY KARRIE JACOBS

Christian de Portzamparc's stunning LVMH Tower proves beauty can bloom within the zoning laws

The Underground Gourmet
BY JOSEPH O'NEILL

Slavic crêpes and Jamaican jerk

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

High-minded toys, high-quality totes, and highly packable tools

Smart City
BY MICHAEL STEELE

Light touch: fine wines for summer quaffing

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Beach bums need not despair: deals on the East End in June

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

In a star-studded Dream, Kevin Kline is a melancholy Bottom

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

The Blues grate, the Rules bore

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Three women with strong musical personalities win the Fisher Prize

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Puff pieces from the ABT

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

CBS's Joan of Arc is high on violence, low on saintliness

Pop Music
BY ETHAN BROWN

Sex bomb Ricky Martin's crossover debut is soul-free

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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