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May 31, 1999 Issue

"When my father bought this farm from his father-in-law 40 years ago, he said, 'It's only a thousand acres, but if you're still around in the year 2000, you stand to make some money.'"
--Millennium-hot-spot landowner Robert Lenauze, from "All About (New Year's) Eve"

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FEATURES
All About (New Year's) Eve
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL

'21'? Exclusive party. Union Square Cafe? Closed. The Pacific isle of Tonga? Booked. Streisand? Also booked. Millennium fever is prompting once-in-a-century anxiety as the Fabulous agonize over where to go and party planners agonize over who'll staff their soirées and how much they're going to charge you for that Y2K thrill.

Piano Woman
BY ETHAN SMITH

Now singing lushly orchestrated, bossa nova–inflected standards, sultry-voiced jazz pianist Diana Krall has graduated from cabaret intimacy to Carnegie Hall primacy. And she's brought a huge cadre of fans along.

The Last Broadway Dynasty
BY ERIC KONIGSBERG

As next week's Tony awards will amply demonstrate, today's Broadway is dominated by the likes of Disney and SFX. Yet one family business remains: the Nederlanders, émigrés from Detroit who took on the Shubert brothers and became the Street's second-biggest landlord. They fill their nine houses with whatever appeals to patriarch James M.'s gut, from The Iceman Cometh to Footloose (remember Shogun: The Musical?), and sold their most beautiful theater to a church. Now the corporate sharks may be circling; is the next generation ready to take over the reins?

Hamptons Gazette
BY RUSTY UNGER

While you were gone, the East End produced a native vodka (potato, of course), chef Alison Becker Hurt took over Quogue, and the Quiet Clam became Nichol's. A town-by-town guide to the new, the redone, the suddenly hip.

Darkness at Noon
BY SHYAMA PATEL

The sun is blinding; the bold-faced reach for bold-faced shades. How Hamptons society covers its eyes.

GOTHAM
Puffy's doctor's note; Candace doles out advice
GOTHAM STYLE Miss Universe gets a makeover

DEPARTMENTS
The National Interest
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

The other loser in Israel was political consultant Arthur Finkelstein

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Kurt Andersen's novel provokes a crisis among the chattering classes

Hollywood
BY NIKKI FINKE

Networks order fewer new shows and Madison Avenue is skeptical

The Insatiable Critic
BY GAEL GREENE

The Red Cat purrs in Chelsea

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Rainbow totes, utility blankets

Smart City

Zagat surveys the market aisles for fresh fish, cheese, and pasta

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Chic wicker baskets for your next al fresco snack

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

The Love Letter offers a romantic alternative to that Menace flick

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

Conor McPherson's lovely Bower

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

A patron's collection reveals Van Gogh et al. in a whole new light

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Opera travesty on a gran scale

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Sam Shepard and Judy Davis are arch foils in Dash and Lilly

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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