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July 19, 1999 Issue

"You would think I wake up in the morning thinking about who I am going to kill. I wake up looking to do some good! We are selling books. We aren't selling weapons of mass destruction."
-- Leonard Riggio, from "One for the Books"

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FEATURES
One for the Books
BY DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

Life before the Internet was pretty sweet for Len Riggio, the Bensonhurst native who turned Barnes & Noble into a retailing colossus. Okay, a few publishers fumed that he was a bully, and independent booksellers groused that he was out to get them. Then came Amazon.com -- styling itself the new-media David to his bricks-and-mortar Goliath -- and the battle turned into an all-out war. Can a guy who's a liberal Democrat and patron of the arts, a self-made intellectual who hangs out with both truck drivers and writers like Gay Talese, ever convince the literary world he's on its side?

Phantom Menace
BY TONY SCHWARTZ

Sure, e-mail is convenient, fast, and informal. It's also intrusive, annoying, and addictive as crack cocaine, as we compulsively field messages in the office, during meetings, while we're on the phone, in bed, and while we're supposed to be on vacation. A meditation on the perils of being connected all the time

Leaving the Academy
BY ETHAN SMITH

During his 32-year tenure, Harvey Lichtenstein transformed the Brooklyn Academy of Music from a provincial relic into an international mecca for the avant-garde lively arts, from Mark Morris's dances to Robert Wilson's epics. On Lichtenstein's parting day, he has a few words for would-be impresarios. And then he's off to work the same magic on the surrounding neighborhood.

Crimes and Punishments
BY CHRIS NUTTALL-SMITH

It's been more than two decades since Frank Penna kidnapped and raped two teenage girls, and it's been seven years since he got out of prison. Now, thanks to Megan's Law, everyone in his hometown of Linden, New Jersey, suddenly knows what he did. Some neighbors insist he's a changed man. Others shoot at his house. Will he ever be allowed to get on with his life?

GOTHAM
The next Adam Sandler, sex object; is Donald Trump broke?
GOTHAM STYLE Bustles are big; Playboy fashion; extreme concierging

DEPARTMENTS
The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

Hillary scouts out the battlefields

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Doppelgänger blues: Michael Wolff, media critic, breakfasts with Michael Wolf, media booster

The Underground Gourmet
BY JOSEPH O'NEILL

Two hot-weather havens

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Prada golf gloves; a global clock for modern families

Smart City
BY BRETT KELLY AND HUNTER KENNEDY

Remembrance of things past: where to buy vintage movie posters, rare books, etc.

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Advantage, customer: the mid-season deal on tennis racquets, shoes, and whites; a beach-bag bonanza in Sag Harbor

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Eric Rohmer, control freak; Arlington Road, controlled freak

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

Naomi Wallace's precious poetics; a Shakespeare (gag) fest

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

MOMA snaps a not-too-pretty picture of America's obsession with celebrity

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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