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August 2, 1999 Issue

"The first day he came to work, there were 100 reporters outside. A paralegal who was making $15,000 a year was offered $10,000 to take a picture of John at his desk."
--Michael Cherkasky, from "John Kennedy, Friend and Neighbor"

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FEATURES
John Kennedy, Friend and Neighbor

From the day he returned to New York to go to law school in 1986 until his death on July 16, John F. Kennedy Jr. never let the constraints of his fame -- the paparazzi, the gossip columns tracking his romances -- stop him from leading a normal life. With a born politician's gift for putting people at ease, he won over everyone, from the D.A.'s office to the offices of George to the bar at Bubby's. John's friends and colleagues recall a man of uncommon warmth. And Michael Wolff examines how his graceful normalcy only fueled our Kennedy obsession.

A Legend in His Own Mind
BY CHRIS SMITH

This time, Abe Hirschfeld is on trial for tax evasion; next up, a charge that he put a hit on his partner of 40 years. But the 79-year-old parking-garage mogul only sees himself as victim. Despite quixotic runs at public office, stints as self-appointed media savior, and a charming penchant for spitting on people, Abe has never found a place in the hearts of eccentric-tolerant New Yorkers. Is he crazy like a fox -- or just plain crazy?

Brand U

If you're still operating in the belief that it's not what you know, it's who you know, it's time to update your paradigm: Today's job market is all about "mindshare" and "personal branding." Scaling the corporate heights requires added value, a shtick that'll set you apart from the drones: like stand-up comedy, or glassblowing (that one oughta get the boss's attention). And if the classes in our annual course bulletin don't land you a promotion, at least you'll have something to fall back on.

GOTHAM
How the Post cranked out its early coverage of the Kennedy tragedy; Talk takes liberties with the Paris Review; is the chair of the SEC an eBay junkie?
GOTHAM STYLE Driven to succeed: personalized Tod's mocs; luxury divorce; Stella McCartney's Chloé boutique opens

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Robert Marc for kids; a perfect picnic cooler; Mai romance

Smart City
BY TONY HENDRA

Terroir fabulous: three wine lists that focus on regional strengths

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Shaker up: A Columbia County getaway is well worth the trip

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

The Haunting is all about effects, but The Blair Witch Project is truly scary

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

An early Brian Friel play, brimming with politics and irony

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

At the Caramoor Festival, a bel canto gem takes flight

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

A prime-time Nightline series warily greets the future

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

Case in point: a list of reasons why you should eat at Five Points

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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