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September 27, 1999 Issue

"If it wasn't for this offense done to the Palestinians in 1947 and 1948, Edward would have become what he basically already is: A New York Jewish intellectual."
-- Christopher Hitchens, "A Palestinian's State"

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FEATURES
Finder's Keepers
BY CORKY POLLAN

What, exactly, are you looking for? A deluxe Art Deco martini shaker? The perfect strand of saltwater pearls? Best Bets sleuth Corky Pollan knows the most promising places to shop for everything from bamboo fly rods to Queen Anne mirrors; from chocolate truffles to David Copperfield's magic tricks. Plus: Corky's exclusive guide to by-appointment-only stores, prized by insiders for their owners' eclectic, eccentric collections.

A Palestinian's State
BY EMILY EAKIN

Edward Said's careerlong attack on American Mideast policy has always derived an increased urgency from his own tale of childhood flight from Jerusalem. But now the Columbia intellectual, whose intimate circle includes Daniel Barenboim, Christopher Hitchens, and Jean Stein, stands accused of having made it all up. Readers of Said's new memoir, Out of Place, will have to judge for themselves whether he has played the victim game to political ends -- or if "emotional exiles" have rights, too.

The Smart Money
BY JOHANNA BERKMAN

Now that Christine Todd Whitman has bowed out, Jon Corzine is suddenly a real -- perhaps the leading -- candidate for Frank Lautenberg's Senate seat. The hirsute former Goldman, Sachs head -- an unlikely liberal Democrat who was ousted last winter -- has never been elected to public office. But he does have a lot of money (about $300 million) to spend on a campaign. Does he really want to make the world a better place, as he says, or is this just an expensive midlife crisis?

GOTHAM
The malling of Manhattan, but in a good way; Ernst & Young's corporate playpen
GOTHAM STYLE Skin jewelry; pocket boots; do boys just want to be girls?

DEPARTMENTS
The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

The FALN brouhaha shows what New York will do to a wishy-washy candidate

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

As with all new-media hustles, to make money on the conference circuit you'd better be on the right side of the business plan

MARKETPLACE
Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

In Hell's Kitchen, Hollywood hair-brain Orlando Pita shops for the tools of his trade

THE ARTS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Kevin Costner's sappy For Love of the Game is the un–Bull Durham

Books
BY WALTER KIRN

Frank McCourt pays tribute to goodness and vitality -- his own

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Forget creepy mummies and gold sarcophagi; "Egyptian Art" at the Met is a celebration of life

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Given David Kelley's track record, it's too soon to write off Snoops

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

Larry Forgione's new-old restaurants are half comeback, half throwback

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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