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October 4, 1999 Issue

"Right now, it's a place for people who don't mind a little funkiness, which I don't. It's real grungy still, and that's what appealed to me."
-- Martha Stewart, "Pier Pressure"

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FEATURES
Pier Pressure
BY ALEX WILLIAMS

Unobstructed river views, fourteen-foot ceilings, block-long offices drenched in sunlight, and elevators that can carry a twenty-ton tractor-trailer: The newly defined Lower West Side has exploded as the most dynamic commercial district in the city. Art galleries, telecom companies, new-media firms, photo studios, and e-commerce companies by the score are passing on traditional midtown quarters and setting up shop in hulking riverside buildings that once served the shipping and manufacturing industries. It's raw, it's dirty, and you need to cab it from the subway to get there, but even Martha Stewart says it's a good thing.

The Show Has Legs
BY JEREMY GERARD

No one's had a more salutary effect on Broadway dancing in the nineties than ex-hoofer Susan Stroman. With Contact, her stunner of a show at Lincoln Center Theatre, the director-choreographer finds a dazzling muse in dancer Deborah Yates (especially opposite flustered foil Boyd Gaines).

Trade War
BY DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

After a century of preeminence in the business of making a market for securities, the New York Stock Exchange has seen its franchise under attack by computerized networks offering cheaper, faster, and (some say) fairer trades. NYSE chairman Richard Grasso has a plan to stay competitive in the electronic future -- but for many brokers, it may mean the end of a way of life.

GOTHAM
Gay men find solidarity with the women of Sex and the City; who'd want Janet Maslin's job?
GOTHAM STYLE A Fashion Week roundup; plus, what they were wearing in the front row

DEPARTMENTS
Cityscape
BY KARRIE JACOBS

If you build it, they will kvetch: When it comes to architecture and P.R., NYU could take a lesson from Columbia

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Writer Joe McGinniss got his own interests confused with those of publisher Little, Brown

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Tiny teapots; a champagne tub that parties like it's 1999

Smart City
BY TONY HENDRA

Watch on the rind: Cheese is good

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Are these pony-skin bags for real?

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Mumford is a creepily mild look at therapy and the 'burbs

Books
BY WALTER KIRN

Thanks to Susan Faludi, men, too, can now enjoy the privileges of gender-based victimization

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Two broad surveys of American art, both hamstrung by social themes, never get the big picture

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Il Viaggio a Reims has been stitched back together; would Rossini be pleased with the results?

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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