New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Table of Contents


October 18, 1999 Issue

"I mean, it just knocked you back in your seat. You could feel it in the room. I said to myself, 'My God, did that white boy just say "white skin privilege"?!'"
-- Tavis Smiley on Bill Bradley, "He Got Game"

Want to browse through back issues? Click here to look through our Table of Contents archives, or click here to look through past articles.

GROUND RULES: Not everything in every issue appears on our website. If it is available online, the article title appears below as acolored, underlined "hot link," which you can click on to read the full text; ifthe article title below is black, the full text of the article is notavailable online. For more information on getting copies or reprints of articlesthat aren't on our web site, call New York Magazine's Information ServicesDepartment at 212-508-0755.

FEATURES
Russian Revolution
BY NINA BURLEIGH

After four years, over $20 million, and an acrimonious lawsuit, Warner LeRoy -- Hollywood scion and master of Maxwell's Plum and Tavern on the Green -- has finally reopened the Russian Tea Room. Onetime regulars will recognize the lavishly re-created first floor, but what will they make of LeRoy's glass-and-gilt fantasy upstairs? And what's up with that on-again-off-again divorce?

He Got Game
BY JENNIFER SENIOR

Al Gore may have the backing of the black political establishment, but Bill Bradley's got Spike Lee, Michael Jordan, Laurence Fishburne, Samuel L. Jackson, and a host of other sports and entertainment celebrities eager to endorse him. And it's not just a basketball thing. He's a straight-shooter on race. Even Al Sharpton is feeling it.

Mild and Crazy Guy
BY ARIEL LEVY

As a teenager in Saugerties, Jimmy Fallon mimicked the masters from Saturday Night Live, and in college, the show was his most steady date. Now 25 -- just like the show -- Fallon's sharp Seinfeld and Sandler riffs, along with his nice-guy appeal, have turned him into Lorne Michaels's newest golden boy.

Pitcher Perfect
BY CHRIS SMITH

Ever since he nailed a perfect game in July, baseball's most creative pitcher, David Cone, has been floundering, leading some to wonder whether his 36-year-old arm isn't ready for retirement. But the notorious party animal turned Yankees elder statesman says the arm feels fine. Could it be that the problems are all in his head?

GOTHAM
The Loews Paradise Theater isn't down for the count, yet
GOTHAM STYLE Twelve-thousand-dollar sleeping bags and other Y2K survival gear

DEPARTMENTS
The National Interest
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

The disorienting spectacle of George W, bashing the right in his journey to the center

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

As Edmund Morris now knows, in a mad world, the sane man looks crazy

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Animal-print laptop totes; bumblebee rain boots

Smart City
BY STEPHANIE WILLIAMS

Pleasantly disposed: a trashy guide to getting rid of junk you don't want anymore

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Sparklers that taste like French champagne, at prices that won't give you a hangover

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Harrison Ford and Kristin Scott Thomas crash and burn

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

In Give Me Your Answer, Do! Brian Friel returns to marital misery

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

MOMA rearranges some familiar works from its permanent collection to stunning effect

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

The Met opens with Cav/Pag (again) and Pl‡cido (again)

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Has Dance Theatre of Harlem abandoned its classical roots?

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

For a genuine taste of Brooklyn, head for the Upper East Side

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift