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December 13, 1999 Issue

"Being the best divorce lawyer in New York is like being the best devil in Hell."
-- Judith Regan, "Buck Rakers"

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FEATURES
Buck Rakers
BY MICHAEL GROSS

Divorce lawyers have always borne witness to our most heinous indiscretions (cf. LeRoy v. LeRoy). But recent changes in the law have allowed them to convert this seedy currency into ever-greater profits. The city's top divorce lawyers explain why splitting up is a $200 million growth industry -- and how you can avoid becoming its latest victim. Plus: a guide to the matrimonial bar's elite ranks.

Marketing 212
BY PEGGY EDERSHEIM KALB

How did a blue-collar chick from Edgewater make it to the top of the New York real-estate market? Not by selling apartments. Barbara Corcoran built her powerhouse firm with sheer promotional moxie and a brilliance at sound bites (and never underestimate those twelve red suits).

Murphy's Law
BY SHEILA WELLER

The four police officers who killed Amadou Diallo last February have been all but convicted by the public and the pols, demanding payback for those shocking 41 bullets. Yet few New Yorkers even know their names. Meet Richard Murphy, speaking here for the first time. Facing life in prison, his real trial begins January 3.

Anywhere but Here
BY ROBERT KOLKER

A funny thing happened on the way to the millennium: While no one was looking, the party of the century turned into a Blockbuster night. The boldfaced names that make Manhattan whir are getting out of town, promoters are dumping their big-ticket bashes, and top chefs are taking the evening off. What's off and what's on -- and what you'll have to do to enjoy the festivities of your choice.

GOTHAM
Corporate America's most embarrassing holiday parties
GOTHAM STYLE Mutant jeans; long underwear as outerwear; tie-dyed slip dresses

DEPARTMENTS
The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

Maybe Rudy doesn't actually want the Conservative Party's blessing

The Bottom Line
BY MARION MANEKER

Bliss spa makes its debut in the new LVMH building on 57th Street, the first American jewel in the luxury conglomerate's crown

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Joys of Christmas past; pony-skin slides; the smallest reading glasses

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Designer looks that won't be too twentieth-century come spring

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Woody Allen's latest take on the brilliant, self-absorbed artist

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

Marie Christine transports Medea to New Orleans -- and cooks up quite a gumbo

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Jenny Saville fleshes out the art world's expectations

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

The Met's Tristan may not be a total triumph, but it's still worth the weight, er, wait

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

HBO's Witness Protection shows it's not easy being a snitch

The Insatiable Critic
BY GAEL GREENE

The fare at Jack's Fifth takes the familiar to heights of simplicity

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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