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Table of Contents


February 21, 2000 Issue

"We're looking with deep intensity from the smallest -- genomes and DNA sequencing -- to the largest issues in astronomy."
-- Museum of Natural History president Ellen Futter, "Planetarium Hollywood"

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COVER STORY
Planetarium Hollywood
BY NATASHA SINGER

Forget Fashion Week: This month's biggest star-wattage event is the opening of the new $210 million Hayden Planetarium, housed in a glittering glass cube that's an instant architectural classic. The planetarium is only the most visible effort by Museum of Natural History president Ellen Futter to give the museum buzz while bringing science to the people. Can the house that Teddy Roosevelt built adapt to Disney values -- and Disney prices?

Bloodless Gore
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Al Gore is a studious, hard-working, stable, earnest sort of guy with a mastery of the issues who's spent his life preparing for the job he's seeking -- a fantasy candidate, in other words. As Bradley falters and McCain hurts Bush, it looks like the vice-president has a real shot. So why can't we get our minds around President Gore?

Man Bites Dog, Etc.
BY ELIZABETH HESS

Before he became the Boston Strangler, Albert DeSalvo trapped pets and shot them with a bow and arrow. Jeffrey Dahmer performed surgery on cats, and David Berkowitz shot his neighbors' dog. ASPCA therapist Stephanie LaFarge treats people who hurt pets -- before they graduate to humans.

GOTHAM
Noshing on gefilte fish with Louis Farrakhan; inside McCain's Staten Island war room
GOTHAM STYLE It's official: Key accessories test-driving the new high-heeled Tod's

DEPARTMENTS
The National Interest
BY LAWRENCE O'DONNELL JR.

Why McCain continues to kick so much butt

The Bottom Line
BY STEVE BODOW

Do "tracking stocks" unlock a company's value or lock up shareholder rights?

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

A newfangled pogo stick; cozy wool slippers

Smart City
BY MAURA EGAN

A long look at the city's best Pilates classes

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

A pregame pep talk for the annual Barneys warehouse sale

Net News
BY HILLARY ROSNER

The best sites for e-mail invites, job-hunting, and free phone calls

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Sitting through the new DiCaprio flick is no day at the beach

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

King John flops royally; Roger Rees wrecks Arms and the Man

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

The Guggenheim becomes Nam June Paik's personal playpen

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Twyla Tharp stumbles through Beethoven's Seventh

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Britain's Gallipoli nightmare; Little Richard's hard-knock life

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

There's lots to like at the new Brasserie, but little that recalls the old

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
(Gossip)

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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