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Table of Contents


February 28, 2000 Issue

"Madonna, Michael, Deepak -- they'll bring Jews back into the faith."
-- Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, "Apocalypse, Nu?"

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COVER STORY
Apocalypse, Nu?
BY ERIC KONIGSBERG

From Hollywood to the Upper West Side, practitioners of what might be called roll-your-own Judaism are filling lecture halls and book-signing parties in pursuit of everything from Kabbalah to "kosher sex" to crossover Hinduism. Joining the wondering Jews are curious Christians, Muslims, and other seekers of the lite -- including the likes of Madonna, Michael Jackson, and Deepak Chopra. Rabbi Shmuley Boteach sees it as the dawning of a Jewish millennium; others say it's the worst blow to American Jewry since the McDonald's bagel.

Winging It
BY KEVIN GRAY WITH NIKKI FINKE

Calling himself an artist who served artists, high-living funds manager Dana Giacchetto was known as much for the cockatoo perched on his shoulder as for the young stars who placed their money with him, including Ed Burns, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Matt Damon. Until, that is, they tired of his name-dropping and began to wonder where their assets were going. Now many of his A-list pals are gone, the SEC is looking over his shoulder, and he's suing his former partners. In an interview with New York, Giacchetto takes on his critics.

GOTHAM
Damian Loeb, artist at large; push-polling the Senate race
GOTHAM STYLE Runway report: What they were wearing in the front row

DEPARTMENTS
MEDIA
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Old-media entertainers wonder where they'll fit in the Internet age

The Body Politic
BY RUSTY UNGER

Doctors aggressively treating Lyme disease fear losing their licenses.

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Paintings sold by the square foot; a store dedicated to pj's

Smart City
BY HEATHER ROBINSON

Brew-ha-ha: A cross-section of tea rooms, Russian and otherwise

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Don't get roped into paying too much for your cableknit sweaters

N.Y. Tech
BY SIMON DUMENCO

Compaq's new look; DVD for dummies; at last, a universal cell phone

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Boiler Room surges with the thrill of making a buck

Books
BY WALTER KIRN

Malcolm Gladwell uses pop science to prove the American myth

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

Stephen Sondheim's first musical finally sees the light of day

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

The Met's beautiful "mummy portraits" are hauntingly familiar

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

JonBenet Ramsey revisited; Dalí meets Disney on NBC

The Underground Gourmet
BY ROB PATRONITE & ROBIN RAISFELD

The quickest cure for winter blahs? Well, dough . . .

CUE
New York Magazine's weekly guide to entertainment and the arts.

Intelligencer
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