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April 17, 2000 Issue

"I've got two younger brothers, and they're like, 'I've got 30,000 shares of stock options.' What did I do wrong?"
-- A 31-year-old advertising executive, "It's Not Easy Being X"

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FEATURES
It's Not Easy Being X
BY ALEX WILLIAMS

Everybody warned Gen-Xers they'd be worse off than their parents; nobody mentioned they'd also get creamed by their ambitious, technologically savvy younger siblings. Thanks to the Internet, the cult of youth is more potent than ever, and devotees -- panicked that they'll be over the hill by 35 -- are fighting to retain their membership cards. And their options.

Stung
BY CRAIG HOROWITZ

It was twenty years ago that transit cop Vinny Davis first crossed paths with a jailed wiseguy wannabe named Richie Sabol. At the time, Sabol was harassing Davis's fiancée, who happened to be his ex-girlfriend. But for Davis, what started as an instinctive effort to protect his wife evolved into an obsession that outlasted his marriage and landed him in the middle of a major mob sting. Now it's the cop who's on trial.

Losing It
BY DAVID COLMAN

Fitness mavens used to consider plastic surgery the last resort of the weak, the obese, and the lazy. But a growing number of personal trainers are feeling the burn -- of the liposuction wand. Some Manhattan surgeons get 20 percent of their business from professional thigh masters.

Miami Vice
BY ROBERT KOLKER AND ETHAN BROWN

When Brooklyn homeboy turned club impresario Chris Paciello arrived in Miami's Washington Avenue demimonde, he had it all: good looks, business savvy, boldface friends like Madonna -- and a reputation for beating up hulking professional athletes. Now federal prosecutors say he not only knocked a few heads but helped his buddies pump a bullet into one.

GOTHAM
Mary Boone's ex opens his own space; Miami hogs our ecstasy
GOTHAM REAL ESTATE
Chuck Knoblauch looks down on Murray Hill; pools are for fools
GOTHAM STYLE
Blue-chip picks and margin calls from Seventh Avenue analysts

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL WITH IAN SPIEGELMAN

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Does Stephen King's cyber smash foreshadow the death of the book

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER

The big sell-off: A white-knuckle account

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Going onesies one better

Smart City
BY CHRISTOPHER BONANOS

Vintage maps of New York City

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Luxe health clubs, free for a day

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Eccentric lives: Stanley Tucci unearths Joe Gould's Secret

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

The creepy Hologram Theory is at best two-dimensional; don't expect much from What You Get and What You Expect

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

The New Museum's "Picturing the Modern Amazon" is better sociology, or maybe comedy, than it is art

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

The Corner pays a convincing visit to the mean streets of Baltimore

The Underground Gourmet
BY ROB PATRONITE & ROBIN RAISFELD

Sandwich Planet is out of this world; City Bakery is up there

CUE
Léa Pool's bid for film freedom; jazz greats go one-on-one; Vine offers Wall Street upscale dining and a new market; Knitting Factory's "Jew Revue"

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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