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Table of Contents


July 17, 2000 Issue

"There's no doubt in my mind that he did this."
-- Steven Brown, "Long Island Murder Mystery"

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FEATURES
Inn Retreat
BY SANDY SOULE

A Victorian beach town or a working farm? A colonial tavern or a contemporary ranch? Winery tour or tubing on the Delaware? If your ideal getaway is anywhere the Hamptons Jitney doesn't stop, our survey of the 30 best bed-and-breakfasts within easy driving range of the city -- from the Jersey shore to the Berkshires and beyond -- will take you there.

Long Island Murder Mystery
BY CRAIG HOROWITZ

Two and a half years after Steven Brown's parents were found in their Suffolk County home, viciously beaten and murdered, the police still haven't made an arrest. But they do have a suspect. And in the hopes of reviving a stalled investigation, Brown has filed an unprecedented civil suit against that suspect. He is Harvey Brown, Steven's older brother.

The X-Factor
BY ALEC FOEGE

When X-Men opens in theaters Friday, the rest of the world will discover what legions of teenage fans -- and more than a few men in their thirties -- have enjoyed for years: the angst-ridden aesthetic of the most popular comic-book franchise in the world. Its secret origin lies in the work of Chris Claremont, who drew on his powers as a Method actor to conceive a grandiose epic that stretched over seventeen years. In the end, his greatest enemy was the marketplace.

GOTHAM
Playing chess with Sting; Paul Sevigny, brother of Chloe, has his fifteen minutes
GOTHAM REAL ESTATE
The Grand Street Co-ops flip their lids: Onetime socialist enclave enters the free market
GOTHAM STYLE
Eyelash hair extensions

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL WITH IAN SPIEGELMAN

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER

How to buy into the demand for high-speed Web access

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Can John Evans and Tony Hendra, two old-media geezers, save the book biz?

Advertising
BY SIMON DUMENCO

How Tommy Hilfiger lost his street (and Street) cred

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

A choose-your-own-kitchen adventure; flip-flops for 4-year-olds

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Slinky, strappy, sexy: Sundresses are the warm-weather staple

Beauty
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL

Little clutches and purses with equally small price tags

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Bruce Willis's inner child isn't much fun to play with

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Two masters at the Met: one soberly simple, the other profoundly shallow

Architecture
BY JOSEPH GIOVANNINI

Columbus Circle finally gets the building it deserves (almost)

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Who was really behind the Atlanta child murders?

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

An open-door policy and great food rule Rao's new Theater District offshoot

CUE
Dr. Dre and Eminem; Bastille Day; a Brasserie spin-off; Barbara Kruger at the Whitney

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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