New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Table of Contents


July 31, 2000 Issue

"Nobody wants to live in a zoo. People walking around as if it were Cannes, waiting for the fireworks -- it's wearing thin."
-- Jerry Della Femina, "Hamptons 2000"

Want to browse through back issues? Click here to look through our Table of Contents archives, or click here to look through past articles.

GROUND RULES: Not everything in every issue appears on our website. If it is available online, the article title appears below as acolored, underlined "hot link," which you can click on to read the full text; ifthe article title below is black, the full text of the article is notavailable online. For more information on getting copies or reprints of articlesthat aren't on our web site, call New York Magazine's Information ServicesDepartment at 212-508-0755.

FEATURES
Hamptons 2000

Ted Fields says he's thrown his last East End bash, Jay-Z's latest blowout concluded promptly at 11 p.m., and even the James Beard Foundation got a visit from the Board of Health. Have we come to the end of an era? Robert Kolker describes what the townies have done to rein in the South Fork's rowdy millionaires, 22. Sarah Bernard reports on the beau monde's latest eatery of choice -- offshore, on Shelter Island, 26. Synergy Spa, where A-listers "bond" with brand-name products, takes commercialism to a new apex. But as Vanessa Grigoriadis observes, the odds of Steven Spielberg's turning up to swill free Taittinger are slim to none, 28. If Michael Thomas leaves Sag Harbor for Brooklyn, Alex Williams asks, does this mean Jerry Della Femina has won? 30. Real-estate queen -- or is it carpetbagger? -- Dottie Herman takes Sarah Bernard for a ride, 32. Plus, Gael Greene unearths everything worth eating on the East End, 34, and Beth Landman Keil discovers the best places for building a beach-worthy body, 39.

Chelsea Mourning
BY JESSE BRONNER

For more than four decades, Stanley Bard has ruled the Hotel Chelsea, where a motley assortment of artists and visionaries from Arthur Miller and Bob Dylan to Patti Smith and David Salle sought refuge (and, in hard times, low rents) in its 252 units. But now the bohemian enclave is threatened by that most lethal creativity-killer of all: a monster real-estate market that has turned the legendary landmark of 23rd Street into a potential gold mine.

GOTHAM
Rudy stars in a sexed-up Abercrombie & Fitch promo
GOTHAM REAL ESTATE
Residential pools fail to make a splash; Alan Alda, $5 million man
GOTHAM STYLE
The bottom line on butt cleavage

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL WITH IAN SPIEGELMAN

The National Interest
BY LAWRENCE O'DONNELL JR.

Dems in L.A. may see more WTO protesters than delegates

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Who would you rather invite to a party, Al Gore or George W. Bush?

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Secret journals, mini-Polaroids, and other care-package inspirations for happy campers

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Altered states: Where to find bargain tailoring in NoLIta

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Michelle Pfeiffer adds class to a standard-issue thriller in What Lies Beneath

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN

Hannah Green's Little Saint finds faith in a French mountain village

Art
BY MICHAEL BRENSON

At the Whitney, Barbara Kruger's singular brand of subversion

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Peter Greenaway soaks up Dutch history in Writing to Vermeer

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

A House Divided and the lunacy of the Reconstruction South

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

Australian for weird: spiced kangaroo on Mulberry Street

CUE
Santana and Macy Gray; Susan Sontag; Indo-Carib rhythms

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift