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August 14, 2000 Issue

"Frank Lucas was as bad as they come. But the guy was a pisser. A pisser and a killer. Easy to like. A lot of those guys were like that. It's an old problem."
-- Judge Sterling Johnson, "Gangster Rap"

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FEATURES
Plat Ducasse
BY GAEL GREENE

You already know that Alain Ducasse is a French folk hero. That he's opened the most outrageously expensive and fussy restaurant in the city, with ranks of Stepford servers and an assortment of twenty pens to choose from to pay your bill. But price and pedigree and pretensions aren't the point: For the Insatiable Critic, the proof is in the amuse-bouche. Can a globe-trotting chef produce a consistently sublime meal? We ask Gael.

Gangster Rap
BY MARK JACOBSON

Frank Lucas ran the most legendary dope ring in Harlem, smuggling heroin from the poppy fields of Vietnam in the coffins of dead soldiers. Even the prosecutor who put him away can't help liking him. Now, after the fancy cars, the opulent furs, the pricey pads, and the offshore accounts, all he has left are the stories -- like the one about Kissinger's jet.

On the Waterfront
BY HELEN ROGAN

When the isolated harborside neighborhood of Red Hook was about to be trashed by a huge garbage-transfer station, community leaders, business owners, and people from the projects all joined together to fight City Hall. But now, with real estate booming and Fairway wanting to move in, leaders of that united front have declared war -- on each other.

High Drama
BY WENDY GOODMAN

Ruby Foo's, the W hotel, Nobu. Designer David Rockwell is famous for exuberant, theatrical spaces. When it came to his own loft in TriBeCa, the focus was on family fun, and the roof was his playground.

GOTHAM
Blacks in blue: The NYPD's Eric Adams takes the spotlight
GOTHAM REAL ESTATE
How Manhattan brokers were dragged into the information age
GOTHAM STYLE
New York goes head over heels for the shoe-boot

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL WITH IAN SPIEGELMAN

The National Interest
BY LAWRENCE O'DONNELL JR.

Colin Powell's speech flies, John McCain's tanks: The convention's speakers reviewed

The Conventions
BY CHRIS SMITH

George W. spent last week stroking the center. Has he left himself open on the right?

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

The return of the little red trike; patchwork duvets

Smart City
BY MARION MANEKER

Launderers who really care about the care of your shirts

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Get sporty: Athletic watches that won't cramp your style

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

An empty-headed update of The Invisible Man; Clint Eastwood's geezers in space

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

In his new play, Tabletop, Rob Ackerman finds truth in advertising

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

The Lincoln Center Festival is reliably risk-free

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

Tom Selleck plays a presidential candidate who sleeps around!

CUE
Red Hot Chili Peppers at Jones Beach; John Waters on terrorist fashion; G-String Divas; Verdi's Don Carlos

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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