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Table of Contents


October 16, 2000 Issue

"I don't have the edge New Yorkers have. I was raised in Hawaii, where there are no natural social predators."
-- Harold Koda, "Portrait by Numbers"

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FEATURES
Portrait by Numbers

Forty-nine percent of us would rather have dinner with Hillary, while 32 percent would rather have dinner with Rick; but Rick wins the trust contest by a sixteen-point landslide. Our exclusive poll shows that character, not issues, is driving this race -- but the public doesn't agree with Lazio about what character is. Michael Tomasky dissects the numbers; Michael Wolff reflects on why Hillary has become the Nixon of our time.

Animal Magnetism
BY SARAH BERNARD

Why a trip to the Amazon may finally make painter Alexis Rockman, a model-handsome York-prep graduate, the king of the Chelsea jungle.

High Tech's Live Wires

While Apple et al. seem to be encountering some turbulence, a mere nasdaq blip can't stop tech from infiltrating our lives. Simon Dumenco profiles veteran Alley entrepreneur Tim Nye about his new streaming-video venture, Alltrue.com; Robert Moritz creates his own personal reality show -- starring his dog; and Derek de Koff does battle with shockingly realistic ninjas on the Sony PlayStation 2. Plus: the latest generation of devices and toys you didn't know you craved. Till now.

Dress Code
BY BOB MORRIS

Harold Koda, the new curator-in-charge of the Met's Costume Institute, isn't, at first glance, fabulous (though Rei Kawakubo called working with him "revolutionary"). Can a professorial man in khakis fill Diana Vreeland's shoes?

GOTHAM
Fashion's new fixation: hamster fur; the evolution of the dinner party
GOTHAM REAL ESTATE
Patricia Duff takes custody -- of a townhouse
GOTHAM STYLE
Bomber jackets and buttons are back; Fashion Week's fave freebies

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL AND IAN SPIEGELMAN

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Now that the debates have become as canned as any other campaign ritual, whose interests do they serve? The media's, of course.

The Culture Business
BY JEREMY GERARD

Once, Broadway shows worked out their kinks outside the spotlight. The Web has changed all that.

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY CORKY POLLAN

Panoramic picture frames and Peugeot pepper mills

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Salon sessions at prices that will blow you away

Beauty
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL

Whitest teeth; tastiest lip gloss; and medically minded spas

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Robert Altman makes Richard Gere likable in Dr. T & the Women

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN

A torrid (and, yes, horrid) Torah-inspired tale

Art
BY MICHAEL BRENSON

The last installment in MoMA's megashow is a launching pad for the museum's

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

A disappointing Don at the Metropolitan Opera

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

The all-too-serious Gideon's Crossing and campy Bette Midler

Pop Music
BY ETHAN BROWN

Radiohead's music speaks for itself

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT

Sampling the knödel at the neo-Hapsburg eatery Wallsé

CUE
Edward Steichen retrospective; the Howard Fishman Quartet at Joe's Pub

Classifieds
Strictly Personals

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