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Table of Contents


January 22, 2001 Issue

"I think Cochran is a genuine religious man. He never said he thought O.J. was innocent, he just defended a client."
-- Calvin Butts, "Grin But Don't Bear It"

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FEATURES
Grin But Don't Bear It
BY JAMES J. CRAMER

The good news is (you didn't bet everything on Priceline, did you?), you've still got a nest egg. But is there any way to keep it safe and growing in this tumultuous market? James Cramer, New York's finance columnist (who happens to have made 38 percent for his hedge fund last year), shares his secrets for building a portfolio that can withstand whatever the economy can dish out. (And for those who've understandably lost their nerve, he also rates the best mutual funds.)

If the Glove Fits
BY NINA BURLEIGH

Johnnie Cochran has made up his mind: After Puffy Combs's acquittal (and he's sure there'll be an acquittal), he's giving up criminal defense and getting back to his civil-rights roots. And O.J.'s former lawyer says he's giving it up with a clean conscience.

Cirque Master
BY PETER KAMINSKY

Le Cirque, the city's leading proponent of food as performance, has a pair of new stars. Introducing (drum roll, please) Alsatian-born Pierre Schaedelin, a master of the classic repertoire, and pastry chef Patrice Caillot, from Provence -- via Las Vegas.

Girls Will Be Boys
BY ARIEL LEVY

T&A is everywhere these days. And in the frat house that passes for pop culture, some women -- if you can't beat 'em, join 'em -- are laughing as hard as the men. They're politically incorrect gender traitors, their feminist mothers' worst nightmare. But could the joke be on them?

GOTHAM
Dr. Russell Warren keeps the Giants ticking after they take a licking
Real Estate: Carl Swanson
Style: Amy Larocca

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL AND IAN SPIEGELMAN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

Bush-administration coverage at the Times: What script does it follow?

Postscript
BY MAER ROSHAN

Money (mis)manager Dana Giacchetto still has at least one friend on the outside: his fiancée, Allegra Brosco

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI

Sales & Bargains
BY SHYAMA PATEL

Savings for shutterbugs seeking to go digital

Travel
BY AMY LAROCCA

A new, better Boca; travel deals in Israel for the intrepid

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Sean Penn's dark, haunting Pledge

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN

New Le Carré is bad medicine

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

The Gilbert & Sullivan Players: Another year of loving revivals

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Polyphonia lacks substance; remembering Tanaquil LeClercq

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN

Do you belong at the Hudson Cafeteria? Does anyone?

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