New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Table of Contents


March 12, 2001 Issue

"People are scared. I have a unit that went on five months ago for $1.35 million and he didn't want to sell. Now it's on at $1.1 million and he's motivated."
-- Broker Robin Horowitz, "Real Estate 2001"

Want to browse through back issues? Click here to look through our Table of Contents archives, or click here to look through past articles.

GROUND RULES: Not everything in every issue appears on our web site. If it is available online, the article title appears below as a colored, underlined "hot link," which you can click on to read the full text; if the article title below is black, the full text of the article is not available online. For more information on getting copies or reprints of articles that aren't on our web site, call New York Magazine's Information Services Department at 212-508-0755.

Real Estate 2001
Picking Up the Pieces
By Carl Swanson

The madness and frenzy of the last few years seem (cross your fingers) to be over. "It's a power shift," says one broker, from sellers to buyers. But the boom left absolutely nothing in the city unchanged.

The Money Pits
BY SARAH BERNARD

During the boom, buyers were willing to pay any price for the superluxury apartment of their dreams. But for some, the reality -- poor construction, cracking finishes, and, yes, loud toilets -- has been bitter indeed.

Where You Live Now

After five years of runaway prices, restaurant saturation, and lightning-fast gentrification, what's next? A close look at what the boom has wrought in 26 neighborhoods from Harlem to Park Slope.

A Modest Proposal
BY SARAH BERNARD

Are New York's most affluent apartment hunters ready to fork over up to $5 million for an apartment on 105th Street, built on the ruins of a former cancer hospital? Developer Dan McLean thinks so -- but then, he's from Chicago.

A Death in the Family
BY LISA DEPAULO

For Susan Berman -- ex-New York Magazine writer and daughter of mob kingpin Davie Berman -- life was a wild ride from Vegas princesshood to bare-bones survival in a run-down L.A. rental. Her friends, including real-estate scion Bobby Durst, got her through the dark times, but she'd pushed some to the emotional brink. Investigators wanted to question her about the long-ago disappearance of Durst's wife. Instead, she was found murdered on Christmas Eve, and the question remains: Whodunit?

GOTHAM
A new law threatens the age-old tradition of overcharging subtenants in rent-controlled apartments
Style: Amy Larocca

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL AND IAN SPIEGELMAN

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER

Tech junkies got burned again this January. Why can't they kick the habit?

The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

Now that Democrats are no longer the "in" crowd, how are they faring?

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Stashable slickers, interactive books, and the latest tech toys

Sales & Bargains
BY SARA CARDACE

Inimitable umbrellas for rainy days

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

Only James Gandolfini rises above the psychobabble of The Mexican Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN

Nuala O'Faolain's overstuffed first novel has dross, but more gold

Theater
BY PETER G. DAVIS

A Skull in Connemara: artistically nil

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

Paul McCarthy's Rabelaisian art jokes have stale punch lines

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS

Jessye Norman suffers at Carnegie Hall; Henze's Ninth is a triumph

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD

The Lost Empire masters the fantastic

Pop Music
BY ROBERT LEVINE

Dave Matthews's pop gets a polish

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT

Tuscan Steak -- not for foodies

The Underground Gourmet
BY ROB PATRONITE & ROBIN RAISFELD

Italian Renaissance: Picasso Cafe and Caffè Linda

Advertising
[an error occurred while processing this directive]