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Table of Contents


April 2, 2001 Issue

"You've seen American Psycho? The first five minutes, where he's getting dressed and using all those face creams?. That's the ideal."
-- "Vanity, Thy Name Is Man"

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FEATURES
Vanity, Thy Name Is Man
BY ALEX WILLIAMS

Time was when no self-respecting man would admit to an obsession with skin creams, botox injections, or enzyme facials. But in today's image-obsessed culture, men of every stripe and sexual orientation are bringing their beauty regimens out of the closet -- to the delight of the cosmetics industry. Are we really ready for a world in which men are the new women? PLUS: Beth Landman Keil runs down the latest in luxe spa treatments and products for men, and a panel of the city's most incisive style arbiters critiques New York men like you.

Hill Trouble
BY JENNIFER SENIOR

When Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott mused that Hillary Clinton might be hit by lightning before she took her Senate oath, it pointed to a discomfiting fact: Her new colleagues seemed to hate her. But a funny thing happened on the way to pariah status. Strom Thurmond hugged her; Jesse Helms jokes with her; and Phil Gramm says he never attacked her -- personally. A story of the strangest of bedfellows -- senators.

Hello, Folly!
BY JEREMY GERARD

Blythe Danner, Judith Ivey, Gregory Harrison, and Treat Williams lead an all-star revival of Follies, Stephen Sondheim's haunted send-off to Broadway's bygone era -- and the folks who lived to tell the tale.

Thriller in Carnegie Hill
BY RALPH GARDNER JR.

When Citigroup sold the rights to build a tower over the Citibank branch at 91st and Madison, it seemed to be a pretty straightforward real-estate transaction. But then outraged citizens decided that the shadow it would cast might blight their whole way of life. What transpired was a scenario worthy of a Woody Allen film -- and one in which he already plays a starring role.

GOTHAM
The mass exodus of Silicon Alley no-longer-hopefuls to -- where else? -- New York.
Real Estate: Carl Swanson
Style: Amy Larocca

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL AND IAN SPIEGELMAN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF

The New York Times' Paul Krugman: A voice for the new, new economy

The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY

Can Alan Hevesi's grounded mayoral campaign achieve liftoff?

The National Interest
BY TUCKER CARLSON

Granny D.'s campaign-finance fairy tale

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets

BY RIMA SUQI
Fat Shaft drivers, celestial navigators, and sheets that tell a story

Sales & Bargains
BY JADA YUAN

Chef Scott Conant gives the dish on the best cookware for your kitchen

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER

A refreshing retelling of John Le Carre

Art
BY MARK STEVENS

"BitStreams" at the Whitney: medium cool

Architecture
BY JOSEPH GIOVANNINI

Rediscovering aluminum at the Cooper-Hewitt museum

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON

A Class Act is a modest affair

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT

The novelty of going Dutch at NL

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS

Mark Morris makes the grade at BAM

Pop Music
BY ROB LEVINE

Aerosmith returns to its roots; Eric Clapton goes to extremes

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