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Table of Contents


June 11, 2001 Issue

"When you walk into the house and there's children or your spouse, you're about as ready to greet them as you are to walk off to war."
-- Battle Zone, New York

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FEATURES
Battle Zone, New York
BY SARAH BERNARD
In this city full of people -- single, committed, and somewhere in between -- the biggest bar-rier to a healthy romance may well be the city itself. From Gracie Mansion to the deepest outer boroughs, New York's distinctive passions -- money, status, space, summer houses, to name a few -- put strains on our relationships that those in other cities can scarcely ima-gine. A taxonomy of urban love and war. Also, Michael Wolff explores the question that's on everyone's minds: Just what is Rudy -- not to speak of his divorce lawyer -- thinking?

Cracking the Case
BY ETHAN BROWN
Harlem's "Black Top" gang was a multi-million-dollar crack ring run by a family that took over a building, monitored police frequencies, and evaded capture for nearly a decade. In a two-year quest to take them down, a frustrated narcotics sergeant came up with a legal strategy that could revolutionize the NYPD's drug-enforcement efforts.

The Mightiest Pen
BY MARION MANEKER
For Vanity Fair's James Wolcott, it's not who you know but who you've offended. From politicians to movie stars to journalists to highbrow authors, there aren't many prominent media targets who haven't felt the smart of the withering Wolcott wit. Next on his list: of all things, a novel. About a cat. Critics, man your typewriters.

Kate Spade Living
BY WENDY GOODMAN
When one of the city's hottest handbag (and shoe and clothing and beauty-product) designers came upon a crumbling old house in the Hamptons, it was an unlikely case of love at first sight. Here's the utterly stylish final product.

GOTHAM
Is America ready for openly gay athletes? Is gay America ready?
Real Estate: Carl Swanson
I'm Right, You're Wrong: Ed Koch and Al Sharpton
Style: Amy Larocca

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL AND IAN SPIEGELMAN

The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY
Call Fernando Ferrer's base what you will -- but don't call it the Dinkins Coalition

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER
Don't let caution blind you to the Fed's latest trick: an upward swing

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Gold-plated juicers, metal watches, and handbags made of sensational scraps

Sales & Bargains
BY BRIDIE CLARK
Entertaining without draining your bank account

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Ken Loach satisfies with Bread and Roses

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Two books about relationships: One clicks, one's clichéd

John Leonard's TV Notes

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Warren Leight's latest doesn't shine

Art
BY MARK STEVENS
A new Leon Golub exhibit paints a dark picture -- of the human race

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT
MarkJoseph: The definition of steakhouse

Pop Music
BY ETHAN BROWN
Radiohead's Amnesiac lacks ambition

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