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Table of Contents


July 16, 2001 Issue

"Nobody comes to the river to stare adoringly at the water. It's the activity on the water that makes people want to look."
-- Buzz O'Keefe, waterfront pioneer, "Getting Wetter All the Time"

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FEATURES
Getting Wetter All the Time
BY JOSEPH GIOVANNINI
Ask New Yorkers where to pick up the PATH train and it's likely that we'll be able to come up with some semblance of the correct answer. But where to catch the ferry to Yankee Stadium? That's a whole different ballgame. Until recently, Manhattanites were isolated from the city's most spectacular natural asset: the water surrounding us. But now that the harbor is cleaner than ever -- and developers are rushing to cash in on it -- we're venturing out on the water in record numbers. Plus: David Amsden and Sara Cardace tackle fishing, frolicking, ferry rides, and countless other ways to have fun in the sun -- and even get wet -- without heading to the Hamptons.

Fashion Victims
BY ALEX WILLIAMS
Last month's game of fashion editors' musical chairs started when Glamour-puss Bonnie Fuller -- perhaps the hottest editrix in the business -- was suddenly dismissed by Condé Nast mogul Si Newhouse. Before the music stopped, youthful, Princeton-educated Kate Betts was out of her dream job at Harper's Bazaar, replaced by brash, frizzy-haired, British Glenda Bailey, formerly of Marie Claire. A gossipy tale of the canny women who rule their rags-and-riches empires with velvet gloves -- and fight with iron fists.

Good Cop, Bad Rap
BY CRAIG HOROWITZ
Brooklyn narcotics detective Zack Zahrey shot hoops with guys who weren't always saints off the court. When one of them was murdered, Zahrey was suddenly suspect. It took three years -- and a lot of help from a felon who had every reason to lie -- to make a case against him. It took a jury ten minutes to set him free. Now Zahrey is suing, in a case that challenges the increasingly dubious use of informants.

GOTHAM
Bobby Zarem's biggest P.R. coup yet: His own life story
Real Estate: Carl Swanson

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

Cityside
BY YVONNE M. DURANT
Irving Hamer: The Board of Ed member everybody loves to hate

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
What anti-globalism is really about -- outside of capitalist America

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Pocket Putters, portable DVD players, and Gucci workout gear

Sales & Bargains
BY BRIDIE CLARK
Straw hats for sophisticates

Travel
BY TARA MANDY
Private villas at Parrot Cay; Switzerland in the summer

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Scary Movie 2: Even worse than the first

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Nick Hornby tackles How to Be Good -- without being humorless

Art
MARK STEVENS
A playful view of pop America at the Whitney

John Leonard's TV Notes

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Randolph-Wright's Blue is too green to succeed

Music
BY ETHAN BROWN
Basement Jaxx's Rooty achieves near-greatness

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT
Sushi heaven at Jewel Bako

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