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Table of Contents


July 30, 2001 Issue

"The Hamptons as we know them have burned down at last."
-- R. Couri Hay, society columnist, "Lizzie in Reverse"

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Web Exclusives
The Big Boys
10 Highest Paid CEOs

FEATURES
Lizzie in Reverse
BY ALEX WILLIAMS AND BETH LANDMAN KEIL
The Grubmans -- Lizzie and her father, Allen, the entertainment industry's superpower attorney -- are as responsible as anyone for the maelstrom of wealth and celebrity the Hamptons have become. And with a moment's pressure on the accelerator of her Mercedes SUV, Lizzie brought that world into profound crisis (and, let's not forget, injured some sixteen people). An inside look at what happened that night, and at the behind-the-scenes battle that's raging fiercer than ever.

A Family's Grief
BY JENNIFER GOULD
When Ylli, Agron, and Mehmet Bytyqi volunteered to go to Kosovo and fight with other Albanian-Americans against the Serbs in 1999, their father was proud: "I wish I'd gone myself," he says. But now that their bodies have been unearthed in a mass grave, he's devastated: They didn't die in combat but were executed after the war ended -- possibly because they were U.S. citizens.

Summer in the Springs
BY GREG DONALDSON
The Springs -- the East Hampton hamlet that's the sole remaining bargain on the South Fork -- is a world away from Lily Pond Lane and Conscience Point (the last time a famous resident got into serious car trouble here was when Jackson Pollock spun fatally out of control in 1956). Or is it? As real-estate prices soar, and south-of-the-highway summer people creep in, locals -- from artists to struggling baymen -- are feeling besieged.

Split Personality
BY DEREK DE KOFF
On TV, actor Christopher Meloni is already a switch hitter, playing sensitive sex-crime detective Elliot Stabler on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and sexually carnivorous inmate Chris Keller on Oz (sometimes with only a two-hour nap in between). But the new movie Wet Hot American Summer may be his biggest challenge yet: a comedy.



GOTHAM

Madonna, New Yorker; De Niro's strangest bedfellow: Rupert Murdoch
Real Estate: Christopher Bonanos
Style: Amy Larocca

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
Andy Lack and Walter Isaacson: newsguys running networks

The National Interest
BY TUCKER CARLSON
Is Gary Condit the victim of Washington sexual snobbery (and a certain similarity to you-know-who)?

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER
With consumer spending higher than ever, why is our economy in a slump? Blame it on the CEOs.

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Tiny cameras, slick supply racks, and convertible coffee tables
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
BY BRIDIE CLARK
Magnificent margaritas at cool prices
Plus: Daily Sales Update

Beauty
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL
Fragrant foot soaks, Calypso Homme, and the latest in cell renewal

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY JOHN LEONARD
Jurassic Park III: Don't expect anything more than effects

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS
Philip Glass's White Raven holds few surprises

Theater
JOHN SIMON
Music From a Sparkling Planet is camp -- but doesn't admit it

Television
JOHN LEONARD
Leap Years: A gimmick that just might work

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN
Ilo's masterful menu needs just a minor edit

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