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Table of Contents


August 6, 2001 Issue

"There's a lot of sitting around the table and asking, 'Where did we go wrong?'"
-- A family doctor, "Medical Malaise"

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FEATURES
Medical Malaise
BY STEVE FISHMAN
Once upon a time, doctors who made it through those eight grueling years of medical training were rewarded with a professional life that virtually guaranteed affluence, independence, and nothing short of reverence from their health-care colleagues and the culture at large. That was before managed care swamped them with paperwork, chipped away at their incomes, and turned them into cogs in the health-care machine. Or at least that's their self-diagnosis. And you were wondering why their bedside manner can leave something to be desired.

Where Cars Go to Die
BY MARK JACOBSON
It was a quest to find the unfindable: a bench seat for a buddy's 1979 Chevrolet Caprice Classic. And it took the author to the Boulevard of Broken Cars just east of Shea Stadium: the vast auto graveyard at Willet Points Boulevard. Call it Karmandu.

The Art of the Con
BY ANTHONY HADEN-GUEST
The dealers in the rarefied circle in which Michel Cohen moved thought nothing of handing over $1 million on a handshake for the promise of a Picasso or a Chagall. When the genial Frenchman vanished -- having conned his victims out of as much as $100 million -- it became clear the art world's connoisseurs hadn't spotted this fake.

A Curious Case
BY BORIS KACHKA
Stepson of Partisan Review editor William Phillips, Allen Kurzweil spent his formative years in fierce intellectual crossfire. No wonder he likes to retreat to the New York Public Library -- or that it took him nine years to research his ingenious, circuitous new novel.



GOTHAM

The end of casual Fridays
Real Estate: Christopher Bonanos
Style: Amy Larocca

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

Media
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
Grubman and Condit: How they've stirred up the perfect media storm

The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY
Hello, teachers' union? This is reality calling.

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Movado watches, Belgian storage units, and sexy belts for him
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
BY BRIDIE CLARK
Beach towels that make a big splash
Plus: Daily Sales Update

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY JOHN SIMON
Planet of the Apes sinks to a crowd-pleasing low

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Three historical novels demonstrate the true range of the genre

Theater
JOHN SIMON
A Harold Pinter retrospective at Lincoln Center is professional, but hardly poetic

Architecture
JOSEPH GIOVANNINI
Philip Johnson's latest lacks originality -- but that's nothing new

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS
Sylvie Guillem's Giselle defies convention, to a fault

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD
James Dean does the legend proud

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT
Blue Ribbon goes family-style in Brooklyn

Pop Music
BY ETHAN BROWN
Madonna's "Drowned World" tour leaves a sinking feeling

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