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Table of Contents


October 29, 2001 Issue

"My kids won't even think about flying anymore. Unless I'm flying the plane myself."
-- Anne Wodenshek, "Children of the Lost"

A Letter from the Editor: A response to concerns about this week's cover of New York magazine

Want to browse through back issues? Click here to look through our Table of Contents archives, or click here to look through past articles.

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FEATURES
After the Terror
BY CHRIS SMITH
Jack, 5, wants to know what happens when people jump out of buildings. Sarah, 9, can't sleep for fear that a plane is going to crash through her bedroom window. September 11 has created aftershocks in our children's minds, in our families, and in our culture that a lifetime won't erase. And it leads many New York parents to ask: Have we been preparing our children for the wrong world?

Children of the Lost
BY JENNIFER SENIOR
As many as 10,000 children lost a parent on September 11 -- that's the saddest number the day produced. The youngest of them -- like 5-year-old Aidan, the son of a firefighter from Squad 1 -- have only the sketchiest ideas of the enormity of what's occurred. But those who are older -- like 8-year-old Haley, one of five children of a Cantor Fitzgerald executive -- feel the loss and its permanence with the heightened intensity of childhood.

Going Public
BY CLARA HEMPHILL
If you think the only good public high schools in New York are the big four -- Stuyvesant, Bronx Science, LaGuardia, and Brooklyn Tech -- it's time to look farther. The 19 promising high schools we profile here aren't as elite or as well-known as the superschools; some of them haven't been around long enough to have racked up impressive test scores and college admissions. But they all have inspired leaders, ambitious educational goals, passionate teachers, and diverse students. And -- best of all -- they're free.

GOTHAM

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
The terrorist assault is so acutely aimed, it's time to stop thinking of it as the work of "foreigners"

The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY
Did Mark Green play the race card? Or was it Roberto Ramirez?

The National Interest
BY TUCKER CARLSON
With all due respect to Rudy and George W., Pakistan's Pervez Musharraf has got the toughest, most important job in the world right now

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Cuddly costumes, cute cold packs, and trendy tees from ISA
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
How to put guests in a party mood in a less-than-fabulous economy
Plus: Daily Sales Update

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Linklater's Waking Life takes animation to new levels

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Rich literary allusions and a nuanced narrative elevate The Nautical Chart above other thrillers

Television
JOHN LEONARD
Simon Schama injects personal passion into A History of Britain

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Mamma Mia!'s mediocrity is saved -- for fans -- by Abba nostalgia

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS
Jane Eaglen fails to deliver in the Met's new Norma

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN
SoHo's Thom deserves a second chance

CUE
Movies
Music & Nightlife
Theater
Art
Kids
Classical & Dance
The Mix

Advertising
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