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Table of Contents


November 19, 2001 Issue

"Bloomberg may get irritated if there are stories about the shadow mayor or the real mayor. But he owes Rudy -- big. "
-- A Bloomberg adviser

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FEATURES
Pretzel Logic
BY VANESSA GRIGORIADIS
Throughout the nineties, yoga became downtown's great leveler, not to mention stress reducer and body toner. At Jivamukti, Anh Duong and Russell Simmons rubbed elbows with bond traders and grungy East Village denizens; yoga supplied a spirituality that seemed to counterbalance Manhattan's intense materialism. Then came September 11. And the search became more serious. One woman's story.

Becoming Mayor Bloomberg
BY MERYL GORDON AND CHRIS SMITH
How will a self-made billionaire with an eccentric management style (look out for tasseled loafers) become an effective force in the hardball politics of City Hall? Factor in a blue-chip circle of friends, a low tolerance for losing, and a passion for loyalty. But don't underestimate the long arm of Rudy Giuliani.

Politics as Unusual
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY
When did $4 billion and a reputation for business acumen become better credentials for the mayoralty than 30 years of public service? Long before September 11, it turns out. An analysis of the cumulative impact of two decades' worth of conservative attacks on government -- and how the government's defenders have misjudged the public mood.

United We Stand?
BY GREGORY A. MANIATIS
On September 11, the U.S. suddenly realized how dangerous its enemies were -- and how much it needed allies. Thus began a new chapter in the nation's rocky relationship with the U.N. and its secretary-general, Kofi Annan, who's not only fighting terrorism but trying to sell the U.S. on the virtues of internationalism. Needless to say, it's a tough job.

GOTHAM

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
How did Bloomberg win? By becoming king of all media.

The Culture Business
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Ronald Lauder's two paradoxical passions: restoring Jewish culture and showcasing German art

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Mod Italian bowls, an S.U.V. stroller, and slinky Swarovski jewelry
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
Faux-shearling coats to warm you up
Plus: Daily Sales Update

Travel
BY TARA MANDY
Miami hot spots, snowshoeing in Colorado, and audio adventure tours THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone lacks the imagination of the book it's based on

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Patricia Volk's Stuffed captures New York at its best

Art
MARK STEVENS
Two optimistic exhibitions on the African-American experience

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Dazzling costumes make up for the inadequacies of The Women; Elaine Stritch's one-woman show is pure acting art

Underground Gourmet
BY ROBIN RAISFELD AND ROB PATRONITE
Inspired dining at DUMBO's Superfine

John Leonard's TV Notes

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS
Garth Fagan offers an astute expression of human isolation

CUE
Movies
Music & Nightlife
Theater
Art
Kids
Classical & Dance
The Mix

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